eyewitness


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Eyewitness

An individual who was present during an event and is called by a party in a lawsuit to testify as to what he or she observed.

The state and Federal Rules of Evidence, which govern the admissibility of evidence in civil actions and criminal proceedings, impose requirements that must be met before the testimony of an eyewitness can be presented during trial. For example, an eyewitness must be competent (legally fit) and qualified to testify in court. A witness who was intoxicated or insane at the time the controverted event occurred will be prevented from testifying, regardless of whether he or she was the only eyewitness to the occurrence.

eyewitness

n. a person who has actually seen an event and can so testify in court.

eyewitness

noun arbiter, attestant, attester, compurgator, corroborator, giver of evidence, identifier, informant, informer, looker-on, observer, one who obtains evidence first hand, one who personally obberves an occurrence, one who testifies to what he has seen, onlooker, seer, spectator, spectator et testis, testifier, viewer, watcher
See also: bystander
References in periodicals archive ?
CRAYTONAND COLLINS: FIRST-TIME IN-COURT (POSITIVE) EYEWITNESS IDENTIFICATIONS
Showup identifications, in which the police present a sole individual to an eyewitness rather than as part of a lineup or photographic array, are suggestive and "generally disfavored" (17) because the witness reasonably may assume that the police have identified the individual as a suspect.
undertaking this inquiry into eyewitness identification reform efforts,
about eyewitness error and its role in producing miscarriages of
differentiating accurate from inaccurate eyewitness testimony, and lack
ABC11 Eyewitness News provides 43 hours of local news every week, serving more than 1 million households in a 23-county area in North Carolina and Virginia.
Brathwaite created a test for determining whether eyewitness evidence obtained through suggestive circumstances could nevertheless be admitted into evidence.
8) Some courts provide jury instructions on the potential unreliability of eyewitness identifications, and many jurisdictions are beginning to update their identification procedures to better align with current scientific understanding of memory.
The Supreme Court Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases had submitted a report that includes three new standard criminal jury instructions, including Florida's first one about gauging the reliability of eyewitness identification.
A classmate will record the changes each eyewitness thought they saw on the board.
LABORATORY research suggests eyewitness identifications are incorrect roughly one-third of the time.