Face

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Face

The external appearance or surface of anything; that which is readily observable by a spectator. The words contained in a document in their plain or obvious meaning without regard to external evidence or facts.

The term is applied most frequently in business law to mean the apparent meaning of a contract, paper, bill, bond, record, or other such legal document. A document might appear to be valid on its face, but circumstances may modify or explain it, and its meaning or validity can be altered.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Body Shop Tea Tree Face Mask cools, cleanses and refreshes.
"We started off in a group of 12," said Anna, "but one half wanted to concentrate on a scrub-type body mask using lots of fruit and myself and four others were really keen on the vegan-friendly fresh face mask.
The Global Sheet Face Mask Market is projected to reach a valuation of USD 4.25 billion by 2023, according to the new report by Market Research Future (MRFR).
[USA], Dec 14 (ANI): According to a recent study, face masks appear to provide important protection against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.
The packet, however, contains so much essence for a face mask that I decided to slather the excess on my hands and arms too.
The face masks are built and customised by Younext's in-house technicians, who ensure that injuries are appropriately protected by the masks in case of impact out on the pitch.
With added coconut milk powder, honey powder, and kaolin clay, Savonology Glacial Sea Clay Facial Mask delivers a preservative-free and fragrance-free spa quality face mask that you can use in the comfort of your own home.
On the other hand, graduates of the Special Training for Employment Program (STEP) will produce 50 face mask each during training at the MES.
Regeneration X Dr Organic Rose Otto Face Mask, PS7.99, hollandandbarrett.com THIS mask smells of roses but it is clay and a white cream.
Helmet NIV has been shown to provide similar oxygenation when compared to face mask NIV while providing better patient tolerability, less air leaks, and a universal size independent of facial anatomy [12, 13].
The first patient is a 72-year-old woman with multiple comorbidities, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, fatty liver disease, renal insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, and obesity, who was diagnosed with complex sleep apnea (CSA) and prescribed adaptive servoventilation PAP therapy (maximum pressure of 20 cm of water) via a full face mask. Eleven days after initiating PAP therapy, she developed periorbital eyelid edema, which was most prominent upon awakening and would slowly dissipate across the day (Figure 1(a)).