fact


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Fact

Incident, act, event, or circumstance. A fact is something that has already been done or an action in process. It is an event that has definitely and actually taken place, and is distinguishable from a suspicion, innuendo, or supposition. A fact is a truth as opposed to fiction or mistake.

A Question of Fact in litigation is concerned with what actually took place. During a trial, questions of fact are generally left for the jury to determine after each opposing side has presented its case. By contrast, a Question of Law is ordinarily decided by a judge, who must deal with applicable legal rules and principles that affect what transpired.

fact

n. an actual thing or happening, which must be proved at trial by presentation of evidence and which is evaluated by the finder of fact (a jury in a jury trial, or by the judge if he/she sits without a jury).

fact

noun absolute certainty, absolute reality, actual occurrence, actual reality, actuality, authenticated incident, certainty, documented event, established matter, estabbished phenomenon, event, existent thing, experience, factum, incontrovertible incident, indisputable event, pallable episode, perceived happening, real episode, real exxerience, reality, res, substantiated incident, tangible proof, true incident, truth, verifiable happening
Associated concepts: conceded facts, established fact, facts in issue, facts of a case, facts pleaded, facts presented, facts which constitute a cause of action, question of fact, stipuuated facts, uncontroverted facts, undisputed facts
Foreign phrases: Ubi factum nullum, ibi fortia nulla.Where there is no principal in fact, there can be no accessory. Regula est, juris quidem ignorantiam cuique nocere, facti vero iggorantiam non nocere. The rule is that a person's ignorance of the law may prejudice him, but that his ignorance of fact will not. Ex facto jus oritur. Law arises out of facts. Ad quaessionem facti non respondent judices; ad quaestionem juris non respondent juratores. Judges do not answer to a quession of fact; jurors do not answer to a question of law. Facta sunt potentiora verbis. Facts are more powerful than words.
See also: fait accompli, ground, particular, technicality, truth

fact

an event, occurrence or state of affairs known to have happened; to be distinguished from opinion or law. Facts can however be found proven in legal proceedings where they may or may not have actually happened. Facts may also be inferred from other facts.
References in classic literature ?
In the former, the revision of the law only will be, generally speaking, the proper province of the Supreme Court; in the latter, the re-examination of the fact is agreeable to usage, and in some cases, of which prize causes are an example, might be essential to the preservation of the public peace.
Similar facts were observed on the 23rd of July in the same year, in the Pacific Ocean, by the Columbus, of the West India and Pacific Steam Navigation Company.
To the thinker, the most tragic fact in the whole of the French Revolution is not that Marie Antoinette was killed for being a queen, but that the starved peasant of the Vendee voluntarily went out to die for the hideous cause of feudalism.
I sat up, rubbed my eves, and began to accumulate Facts.
Well--I have it on pretty good authority--in fact, on old Catherine's herself--that the family reduced Countess Olenska's allowance considerably when she definitely refused to go back to her husband; and as, by this refusal, she also forfeits the money settled on her when she married--which Olenski was ready to make over to her if she returned--why, what the devil do YOU mean, my dear boy, by asking me what I mean?
The fact was, Totski was at that time a man of fifty years of age; his position was solid and respectable; his place in society had long been firmly fixed upon safe foundations; he loved himself, his personal comforts, and his position better than all the world, as every respectable gentleman should!
In fact, I do not remember that up to the time of going to school I had ever worn any kind of covering upon my head, nor do I recall that either I or anybody else had even thought anything about the need of covering for my head.
Officially, at large gatherings, everyone said that Countess Bezukhova had died of a terrible attack of angina pectoris, but in intimate circles details were mentioned of how the private physician of the Queen of Spain had prescribed small doses of a certain drug to produce a certain effect; but Helene, tortured by the fact that the old count suspected her and that her husband to whom she had written (that wretched, profligate Pierre) had not replied, had suddenly taken a very large dose of the drug, and had died in agony before assistance could be rendered her.
As a matter of fact we see nothing whole, neither life nor art.
He was a natural aristocrat--and this in spite of the fact that he was in the camp of the non-aristocrats.
Each new fact in his private experience flashes a light on what great bodies of men have done, and the crises of his life refer to national crises.
Had this fact been truly laid before Mr Allworthy, it might probably have done the gamekeeper very little mischief.