fact

(redirected from facts of life)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Fact

Incident, act, event, or circumstance. A fact is something that has already been done or an action in process. It is an event that has definitely and actually taken place, and is distinguishable from a suspicion, innuendo, or supposition. A fact is a truth as opposed to fiction or mistake.

A Question of Fact in litigation is concerned with what actually took place. During a trial, questions of fact are generally left for the jury to determine after each opposing side has presented its case. By contrast, a Question of Law is ordinarily decided by a judge, who must deal with applicable legal rules and principles that affect what transpired.

fact

n. an actual thing or happening, which must be proved at trial by presentation of evidence and which is evaluated by the finder of fact (a jury in a jury trial, or by the judge if he/she sits without a jury).

fact

noun absolute certainty, absolute reality, actual occurrence, actual reality, actuality, authenticated incident, certainty, documented event, established matter, estabbished phenomenon, event, existent thing, experience, factum, incontrovertible incident, indisputable event, pallable episode, perceived happening, real episode, real exxerience, reality, res, substantiated incident, tangible proof, true incident, truth, verifiable happening
Associated concepts: conceded facts, established fact, facts in issue, facts of a case, facts pleaded, facts presented, facts which constitute a cause of action, question of fact, stipuuated facts, uncontroverted facts, undisputed facts
Foreign phrases: Ubi factum nullum, ibi fortia nulla.Where there is no principal in fact, there can be no accessory. Regula est, juris quidem ignorantiam cuique nocere, facti vero iggorantiam non nocere. The rule is that a person's ignorance of the law may prejudice him, but that his ignorance of fact will not. Ex facto jus oritur. Law arises out of facts. Ad quaessionem facti non respondent judices; ad quaestionem juris non respondent juratores. Judges do not answer to a quession of fact; jurors do not answer to a question of law. Facta sunt potentiora verbis. Facts are more powerful than words.
See also: fait accompli, ground, particular, technicality, truth

fact

an event, occurrence or state of affairs known to have happened; to be distinguished from opinion or law. Facts can however be found proven in legal proceedings where they may or may not have actually happened. Facts may also be inferred from other facts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course nepotism and patronage are also facts of life, but they are bitter pills to swallow.
If Shane's got to 16 and still doesn't know the basics, his mother is shockingly reprehensible - not just in failing to acquaint him with facts of life, but in the whole raft of responsibilities contingent on having a relationship with someone that involves sex.
Without the intensity of Smoking Poppy, or the wider canvas of Facts of Life, it seemed Limits of Enchantment could almost have been a story Joyce wrote earlier, then set aside.
In this modern world Youth is entitled to a knowledge of Hygiene-a complete understanding of the Facts of Life.
Yet too often, it's exactly these financial facts of life that successful parents fail to communicate to their children.
Grangers of the world to the punch in telling their daughters the facts of life.
Henry David Thoreau wrote in Walden, "I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I come to die, discover that I had not lived.
But when it comes to the financial facts of life it's a different story.
And the only difference was that one of them was dedicated to the earth and the facts of life, which was the blues, and the spiritual things were dedicated to heaven and after death, you know.
In arguing that these texts transformed "crime and the existence of criminals into 'simple facts of life'" Leps overlooks the examples of Jonathan Wild, the vagabonds of Elizabethan England and the fur-collar criminals of the late middle ages who were also acknowledged as facts of life.
A superb giftbook or introduction to the facts of life, especially for a child who may be anxiously awaiting the arrival of a new sibling.
Since temperatures, airborne spores, and moisture are facts of life, the only controllable variable is the food source--primarily paper-faced dry wall.