felon


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Felon

An individual who commits a crime of a serious nature, such as Burglary or murder. A person who commits a felony.

felon

n. a person who has been convicted of a felony, which is a crime punishable by death or a term in state or federal prison. (See: felony)

felon

noun convict, criminal, culprit, delinquent, guilty person, lawbreaker, malefactor, offender, outlaw, recidivist, recreant, reprobate, sceleratus, scelestus, transgressor, wrongdoer
Associated concepts: convicted felon
Foreign phrases: Nullus dicitur felo principalis nisi actor, aut qui praesens est, abettans aut auxilians ad feloniam faciendam.No one is called a principal felon except the party actually committing the felony, or the person who is present, aiding and abetting in its commission.
See also: assailant, captive, convict, criminal, hoodlum, lawbreaker, malefactor, outlaw, prisoner

felon

a person who has committed a FELONY.
References in periodicals archive ?
To date, no case has been brought challenging felon disenfranchisement in Alaska.
We can start by acknowledging that felon disenfranchisement is a civil rights issue of great importance.
Laws vary in other states, but voting rights are restored to felons in the vast majority of states upon completion of a sentence, including prison, parole and probation.
Automatically restoring felons' right to vote when they've completed their punishment--as 38 states do--isn't in the best interests of felons or the public.
The original disenfranchisement law "had terrible racial and anti-democratic effects," says Jessie Allen, an attorney who worked on an unsuccessful legal challenge to Florida's felon disenfranchisement regime in the early 2000s.
With a presidential election nearing, felon voting rights is likely to remain a popular topic as candidates from both parties have expressed support for re-engaging citizens whose votes could make a difference in some states.
In Wichita, a felon brought a shotgun to the undercover BATFE, storefront.
But felon disenfranchisement as we know it began in the years following Reconstruction, during the "Redemption" period in which former Confederates violently deposed Republican governments throughout the South.
Part II of this Comment will explore the various state and federal felon firearm possession regulatory schemes in place throughout the country.
In October 2004, an immigration judge found that Powell was not an aggravated felon because the state did not prosecute him as a recidivist drug offender.
The federal government and many states have enacted legislation that prohibits, to some extent, a felon from lawfully possessing a firearm.