fertile

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fertile

adjective arable, bearing offspring freely, fecund, fecundus, feracious, fertilis, flowering, fructiferous, fructuous, fruitful, imaginative, ingenious, lush, luxuriant, original, originative, parturient, philoprogenitive, procreant, procreative, productive, progenerative, prolific, rank, rich, yielding
Associated concepts: fertile octogenarian rule, presumption of fertility
See also: beneficial, gainful, lucrative, original, productive, prolific, resourceful
References in periodicals archive ?
Indian fertilizer requirement is largely dependent on imports around 25% in case of Urea, around 50% in case of Natural gas (feedstock), more than 50% in case of phosphatic and around 100% for potassic fertilizers.
He said that strategic reserves of fertilizer must continue to be maintained at all times to ensure food security.
Nadeem Amjad, Chairman PARC highlighted the imbalance in fertilizer use and said that high fertilizer prices are the major constraints to achieve high crop yield.
Each polymer-coated fertilizer particle is known as a prill' and nutrient release is precisely controlled by the chemical composition and thickness of the polymer coating.
Some manufactured brands of fertilizer are manufactured with artificial and natural ingredients, so do not be confused by marketing statements that tout an organic content of a product.
A dramatic increase in fertilizer imports in recent years has put the spotlight on an aging fertilizer handling and storage infrastructure in the U.
Kelp (or seaweed) has been used as a fertilizer for years.
Not to mention trekking to the nursery and lugging home heavy bags of fertilizer, and then worrying over dispersing their granular contents effectively.
Safe Food and Fertilizer does not advise the adoption of either the AAPFCO standards or the zinc fertilizer rule.
Food grown with this fertilizer feeds some 2 billion people, estimates Vaclav Smil, a professor of geography at the University of Manitoba, writing in the July 1997 issue of Scientific American.
It was the successful culmination of work by WasteCap Wisconsin, Royster-Clark and many others testing whether scrap drywall could be used as a source for gypsum in the manufacture of fertilizer.