fetus

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fetus

noun baby, embryo, genesis, immature stage, life, origination, seed, source, starting point, unborn young
See also: embryo
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of Doppler ultrasound has been recently introduced for the study of fetal circulation and various vessels including the both uterine artery, umbilical artery, and middle cerebral artery (MCA).
These pressures on the fetus squeeze the surrounding organs and blood vessels, possibly affecting fetal circulation. In these cases, although fetal flow velocity was within the normal limit, the pressures during uterine contractions might be changing.
The maternal blood is released into the intervillous space and separated from the fetal circulation by the syncytiotrophoblast layer, some few cytotrophoblast cells, and the endothelial cell layer of the fetal capillaries, which are surrounded by stromal fibroblasts and fetal macrophages.
The hyperdynamic fetal circulation with subacute or moderate chronic anaemia has been mainly researched (and is now routinely used) in pregnancies with red cell isoimmunisation.
The hypoxic event induces a compensatory response in the form of exaggerated erythropoiesis resulting in the release of immature red blood cells into the fetal circulation. The number of NRBC/100 WBC is variable but is rarely greater than 10 in normal neonates.
Once the periodontal bacteria reach the fetal-placental interface, either the host can rid of it, or the periodontal bacteria can cross the placental barrier and enter into the fetal circulation. If the bacteria enter the fetal circulation, the fourth immune response occurs, causing further structural damage--this time to fetal tissues and organ systems.
It may cause gallstones or jaundice in the mother, and increased levels of serum bile salts can enter the fetal circulation and cause a reduction in the level of oxygen in the placenta.
I will begin by briefly reviewing the basic anatomy and physiology of the fetal circulation, reviewing the normal values in cord segments from newborns, a discussion of the importance of these measurements, and finally conclusions.
Furthermore, it is currently not known whether natriuretic peptides in the fetal circulation derive from the fetus itself or whether there is a placental exchange of maternal natriuretic peptides.
AFP contributes to oncotic pressure in the fetal circulation. Elevated AFP levels without fetal abnormalities are thought to indicate defects in placental function.