References in classic literature ?
He raised his fettered ankle and examined the lock.
The fettered ankle halted his first step, but he stretched at full length along the table, extending eager fingers toward the prize.
Now were the fetters struck from the last of the red men, and thirteen strong we met each new charge of the soldiers of Salensus Oll.
"To the upper chambers!" shouted the red man who was still fettered to the floor.
A faint clink of his fetters made the woman turn her head.
"My fetters"--the book says--" were struck off on the banks of the stream, in the starlight of a calm night by an athletic, taciturn young man of the people, kneeling at my feet, while the woman like a liberating genius stood by with clasped hands." Obviously a symbolic couple.
In fact, the exhortation seemed rather a superfluous one to a man with a great pair of iron fetters on his feet.
No way but to fetter 'em; got legs,--they'll use 'em,--no mistake."
Whether it was the absence of the fetters or not, it made no very deep impression on Mr Lenville's adversary, however, but rather seemed to increase the good-humour expressed in his countenance; in which stage of the contest, one or two gentlemen, who had come out expressly to witness the pulling of Nicholas's nose, grew impatient, murmuring that if it were to be done at all it had better be done at once, and that if Mr Lenville didn't mean to do it he had better say so, and not keep them waiting there.
He walked out into the court and paced it to and fro; startling the echoes, as he went, with the harsh jangling of his fetters. There was a door near his, which, like his, stood ajar.
"You will not deny, Clara, that any thing which is fettered is not free?
And at any rate, she lost nothing by continuing the engagement, for she has proved that it fettered neither her inclination nor her actions.