figurative

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figurative

adjective allegoric, allegorical, anagogic, anagogical, depictive, descriptive, emblematic, emblematical, evidential, exhibitive, expressive, figural, illustrative, imitative, implicative, indicatory, metaphoric, metaphorical, pictographic, pictorial, portraying, representational, representative, satirical, simulative, standing for, suggestive, symbolic, symbolical, symbolizing, symptomatic, typical, vivid
See also: representative
References in periodicals archive ?
In all areas of distraction, of a real importance are the senses, especially visual ones (the visual channel makes about 80% of received information) or the data of figurativeness.
Figurativeness emerges as the result of observing consciousness, the outcome of its correlations with material and mental reality.
We will overlook those features of imagination, analysed by Sabolius, which are important for the formation of figurativeness.
Speaking about intentionality, it is important to know that the received internal image and the qualities of figurativeness (colour, form, texture, dynamics, shining, etc.
19) When the narrator reproduces or represents critical experiences, a manifest increase in figurativeness can sometimes be observed.
30) And he goes beyond that: he observes figurativeness in the outside world, which is not the result of his rhetorical attribution: "wo der Rolltreppe die Luft ausging" ("where the escalator ended," 776); "Die ausgeknipste Zigarette liess ich fallen.
Unlike his precursors in the representation of insanity in modern German literature, Grass does not deploy apparent figurativeness in the context of the abolition of communicative norms and the liberation of strictly personal exchange.
This claim rests on our assumption that the network of creative, marked figurativeness gives rise to a kind of second order action, an "observation of observation" as defined by Luhmann.
In Heine' s case, the reader, despite possibly being taken aback by the drastic nature of its figurativeness, is thus turned into the prime collaborator.
A tension exists in the reading of such a text between figurativeness and a true change, a suggestion of actuality coming into literature from the outside of language, a manifestation of a change that feigns to be something else than merely linguistic.
Hillis Miller because of its self-contradictory figurativeness.