filthiness


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See: defilement
References in periodicals archive ?
Filthiness Presence of dirt materials, foreign bodies in the product like insects, splinters, grass and hair in the product.
Let there be no filthiness, no silly talk, no levity which is not fitting but instead let there be thanksgiving.
RAWALPINDI -- Civic facilities on Adiala Road deteriorating constantly, as both Chaklala Cantonment Board (CCB) and Potohar Town Administration have turned a blind eye towards the ever-increasing phenomenon of encroachments and filthiness in the area.
But perhaps the most enduring memory of all was the sheer filthiness of the place.
justifies [his] homophobic wrath" (Keiser 1997: 2), and this is the purpose that it ultimately serves, being "an accidental offshoot of the logically prior choice to construct sodomy in terms that stress its repulsive filthiness rather than its irrational sterility" (Keiser 1997: 5).
God "made the Israelites the executors of his vengeance" because these "idolaters" were "immersed in the filthiness of all manner of vice.
So will the procurer say that buys young maidens to use them for filthiness.
Heidelberg sees baptism as release from the past and strength for fighting future sin while the Helvetic Confession agrees that baptism releases from sin while enabling one to "be called a son of God; to be purged from the filthiness of sins, and to be endued with the manifold grace of God, in order to lead a new and innocent life" (Beeke & Ferguson, 1999, p.
in Carmarthen She sings: "Take me back to England, And the grey, damp filthiness of ages and battered books, And fog rolling down behind the mountains, On the graveyards and dead sea captains.
There is a small and very nice cafe at the Doha Park in Muharraq, where a few days ago in broad daylight I shouted at a gang of youths because of their filthiness in leaving one of the tables awash with tea, deliberately poured, and filthy wet crumbs left on the floor under the table for the poor staff to clean up.
12) In Revelation 17, the Whore appears to John of Patmos as a woman "arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication" (Revelation 17.
Sounding intoxicating and intoxicated, Harvey's tawdry travelogue of "stinking alleys," "drunken beatings," "the gray, damp filthiness of ages" and "dead sea captains" certainly isn't regal, but it has undeniable character.