product

(redirected from fission product)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

product

noun accomplishment, article, article of merchandise, article of trade, commodity, creation, crop, effect, emanation, end result, final outcome, fruit, handiwork, harvest, invention, issue, item, merchandise, offspring, opus, outcome, output, proceeds, produce, result, salable commodity, stock in trade, yield
Associated concepts: product defect, product patent, proddcts liability
See also: amount, conclusion, consequence, development, effect, invention, item, outcome, outgrowth, output, proceeds, result

product

in PRODUCT LIABILITY, any goods or electricity including any goods comprised in another product whether by virtue of being a component part or raw material or otherwise. ‘Goods’ is defined as including substances, growing crops and things comprised in land by virtue of being attached to it, and any ship, aircraft or vehicle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a configuration tends to be the simplest core design, but processing out fission products is quite difficult because thorium is chemically almost identical to the rare earth fission products.
plutonium, 4% fission products, and the remainder U-238.
2] grain boundary oxidation, on the effect of fission products on fuel oxidation, on the segregation of rare-earth elements in U[O.
Considering only such fission products as radioactive carbon, strontium and cesium, he calculated that genetic damage, plus the immediate and delayed damage to immune systems, would accelerate the deaths of between 500,000 and 1 million people worldwide for every fifty megatons of nuclear explosive power.
It was at the hearing in Angarsk that the AECC's Site 310 was revealed to have in storage radioactive waste containing uranium, transuranic elements, uranium fission products representing process waste from manufacturing uranium fluoride compounds, contaminated equipment, and spent sources of ionizing radiation.
During nuclear fission, plutonium and uranium generate many lighter fission products, such as xenon isotopes.
The first is a porous carbon buffer layer that can accumulate gaseous fission products and accommodate core deformation, which might occur during the nuclear fuel lifetime.
Operating nuclear reactors contain large amounts of radioactive fission products which, if dispersed, could contaminate soil and vegetation, and be ingested by humans and animals.
Aerosols that form when fission products vaporize will, as they decay, deposit heat onto whatever they've become attached to.
During the reprocessing of spent fuel for recovering of valuable elements, the very small quantity of radioactive fission products (waste) is isolated.
These products are indeed highly active immediately after this reaction, but the elements produced are no longer uranium, and though these fission products have a wide range of radioactive half lives these are all shorter than that of natural uranium.