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ENGLAND flattered to deceive in the World Cup until their last win against Slovenia.
The South Americans, who beat Brazil and drew with Argentina during their qualifying campaign, flattered to deceive before the break, but were more of a threat after it and reduced the deficit through Lucas Barrios' fine 58th-minute strike.
There was little for the sparse crowd to enthuse about afterwards as both sides flattered to deceive in front of goal with neither keeper forced into action.
THE SUN: On a day when Boro flattered to deceive, there were poor displays across the pitch.
The grey has been set some stiff tasks against the likes of champion stayer Yeats but often flattered to deceive when cruising into contention in the closing stages, only to be outbattled in the dying strides.
It was a fitting end to a Premiership campaign for Wanderers who have often flattered to deceive, but have become a side who are equally capable of purple patches.
It was less than three weeks ago that Town overcame The Steelmen 2-0 at home with David Stone and Alex Bolt their marksmen and though their rivals were quietly fancied at the start of the season to make an impact they have only flattered to deceive.
According to Frank Dobson, from Townsend Crescent in Morpeth: "He flattered to deceive - in both senses" while Carol Glenwright, from Rectory Road in Gosforth used her full 20 words to say.
The young Scot is a terrifically talented player who has often flattered to deceive at Goodison but the composure and technique that he showed in taking his goal in such high-pressure circumstances deserved to win any game.
Ouninpohja flattered to deceive in his last outing but he is one to watch at Ludlow today.
While England flattered to deceive on their tournament debut, their likeliest rivals for the gold medal, New Zealand, Fiji and Australia, all started off with impressive successes.
Another victory for the Ulsterman, whose past performances in recent years have regularly flattered to deceive, should be on the cards.