fleshly

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This is not to insistently divide poetry from prose, or poetic form from sacred plot, since certain works, I suggest, imbue the foot with a devotional charge not wholly unrelated to the implied fleshliness of prosodic terminology.
of California Press, 1987), 6, argues that "medieval efforts to discipline and manipulate the body should be interpreted more as elaborate changes rung upon the possibilities provided by fleshliness than as flights from physicality," and uncovers "the extent to which religious women derived their basic symbols from such ordinary biological and social experiences as giving birth, lactating, suffering, and preparing and distributing food.
However, "the fleshliness of 'Vivien,'" Buchanan charges,
Fully conscious of this themselves, the fleshly gentlemen have bound themselves by solemn league and covenant to extol fleshliness as the distinct and supreme end of poetic and pictorial art; to aver that poetic expression is greater than poetic thought, and by inference that the body is greater than the soul, and sound superior to sense; and that the poet, properly to develop his poetic faculty, must be an intellectual hermaphrodite, to whom the very facts of day and night are lost in a whirl of aesthetic terminology.
In The Last Tournament, the ethereality of Arthurian music contrasts with the fleshliness of Tristram's.
30 The primary accusation, on which this writer grounds all the rest, seems to be that others and myself 'extol fleshliness [12] as the distinct and supreme end of poetic and pictorial art; 12.
These "fleshly gentlemen," he declaims, "have bound themselves by solemn league and covenant to extol fleshliness as the distinct and supreme end of poetic and pictorial art; to aver that poetic expression is greater than poetic thought, and by inference that the body is greater than the soul" (Maitland, p.
In "Lucretius and Modem Materialism," Buchanan considers Victorian science as if it were another form of poetry, (26) and makes allegations against Tyndall's Lucretian doctrines which closely resemble his earlier admonition of Rossetti's immoral fleshliness.