flightiness


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Byron reportedly came to regard this tale as "the most metaphysical of his works,"(20) dismissing it with the same term he later used to describe the blind flightiness of Coleridge in the dedication to Don Juan (".
Between his jealousy and your Geminian flightiness, you've got a long way to go before thinking of setting up home.
Ascribing to one's preference of musical mode a portent of individual emotional sensibility, Le Jeune invites his "companions to honor music of serious rationales, of serious notes and measures, in order to convince the most prudent of neighboring nations that our flightiness and changes have run their course; that a firm harmony is established in our hearts, and that the peace that is supported on our constancies is a lasting tranquility, not a temporary calm" (pt.
Anyway, flightiness notwithstanding, a big bull Nilgai is one tough test of a bullet; it's virtually impossible to shoot through one with any sort of conventional slug having a simple, cup-type jacket and homogeneous core.
Perhaps flightiness is not the right word, but it is a devil-may-care tone; which I do not like when it proceeds from under a hat, and still less from under a bonnet.
To counteract the flightiness of the players, the coaches assume the role of teachers, feeling the need to remind the players of the dos and don'ts while you're wearing the club crest.
Knightley continues to go from strength to strength with each project, giving Anna a flightiness and impulsiveness that feel almost more like an Ibsen heroine than a Tolstoy one, but it's a smart take on the character, and she truly impresses when she lets the fireworks fly towards the end.
That makes the Benelli precise without a hint of the street-fighter flightiness apparent in the Ducati S4RS, or the KTM 990 Superduke.
That makes the Benelli precise without a hint of the streetfighter flightiness apparent in the Ducati S4RS, or the KTM 990 Superduke.
En route to his family's Christmas celebration, Nate meets Brenda (Rachel Griffiths, an Oscar nominee for ``Hilary and Jackie''), a free spirit whose flightiness disguises how troubled her life has been.
Most homesteaders don't want high-producing hybrid birds for reasons ranging from their flightiness to the more pleasing appearance of older and heavier breeds.