flotsam


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Flotsam

A name for the goods that float upon the sea when cast overboard for the safety of the ship or when a ship is sunk. Distinguished from jetsam (goods deliberately thrown over to lighten ship) and ligan (goods cast into the sea attached to a buoy).

flotsam

floating goods from a shipwreck. See JETSAM, LAGAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
The KitchenBar also serves a good mix of entrees like seared garlic tuna and snack food such as the Flotsam Baguette with eggs and chimichurri sauce.
To make up for that, one of my favorite things to do on a weedline or around a piece of flotsam that has produced a bite on the troll, after we have exhausted the topwater action, is to pull the lines out of the water and grab a pair of spinning rods and go fishing.
Seafarers have analyzed such debris, called flotsam, for centuries: Noticing odd items washed up on European beaches led Vikings to new harbors and Columbus to discover the New World, the authors reveal.
I realised that the best protection on such matters is to accept the Celtic peoples are the flotsam of Europe, left on the shores of the Atlantic and its neighbouring seas.
Tracking Trashing: Flotsam, Jetsam and the Science of Ocean Motion" (Houghton Mifflin, $18), contains a wealth of information about the oceans and the good and the bad of what is out there.
God bless the West, there was a gun mag among the collection of literary flotsam on a table, so I was good as the clothes swished around.
The Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children was awarded to Flotsam, illustrated by David Wiesner, and the Michael L.
Metallica, Flotsam and Jetsam, Slayer, and VOIVOD were all on Metal Blade and were all vying for the same dollar and gigs.
The sad outcome is that Yagman and this horde of flotsam may be rewarded with millions of taxpayer dollars.
In some of his smaller photographs, Schmelling isolates details, illuminating pathetically preserved doll parts, old advertisements, and trashed audio cassettes--an inventory of cultural flotsam and jetsam.
That is why certain schools, churches and even power stations can survive from one century to another, examples of creative adaptation which put to shame the flotsam and jetsam which too often surrounds us.
More golf balls, tennis, balls, soft balls, parts of boats, or just useless flotsam and jetsam?