foeman


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The strategy that they devise to cope with prejudice allows them to establish what communication theorists Foeman and Nance call "a culture common to them," which helps to "ensure the survival of the relationship"(552).
After acknowledgment, they may avoid family outings and reunions (Foeman & Nance, 1999).
Quoting a parody from The Pirates of Penzance and a stanza from The Lady of the Lake is more than is necessary for 'a foeman [...] worthy of our steel' (Baskerville, p.
As many researchers note, the challenges faced by intercultural couples often appear to surpass the everyday struggles and negotiations faced by monocultural and racial relationships and families, and anecdotal evidence suggests that many African and non-African Australian couples contend with numerous difficulties (Luke and Carrington 524; Durodoye 71-81; Foeman and Nance 540-557).
Anita Foeman, also of West Chester University, shared information about a grant-funded project that asks people to tell their family stories, get their DNA tested and then rethink their stories based on additional data.
Biancone's attorney Alan Foeman said: "It's obvious this case is being handled in a way to deliver a message.
They have shared your nightly vigils, They have shared your daily toil; And their blood with yours commingling Has enriched the Southern soil, They have slept and marched and suffered Neath the same dark skies as you, They have met as fierce a foeman, And have been as brave and true.
Your foeman is more subtle, dangerous, deadly than Tippoo Sahib ever was....
In particular, researchers have questioned whether courses in the discipline favor some cognitive styles at the expense of others (Nance & Foeman, 1993).
'Go back and tell them, Senor,' he continued, 'that every Cuban patriot stands with breast bared for the foeman's steel.'" But soon an astute observer noted that this stilted boast had a startling resemblance to lines from Gilbert and Sullivan's then-popular The Pirates of Penzance: "When the foeman bares his steel,/ Tarantara!