People

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People

The aggregate of the individuals who comprise a state or a nation.

In a more restricted sense, as generally used in Constitutional Law, the entire body of those citizens of a state or a nation who are invested with political power for political purposes (the qualified voters).

people

n. the government in a criminal prosecution, as in People v. Capone. Such a case may also be captioned State v. Davis or in federal prosecutions, United States v. Miller.

PEOPLE. A state; as, the people of the state of New York; a nation in its collective and political capacity. 4 T. R. 783. See 6 Pet. S. C. Rep. 467.
     2. The word people occurs in a policy of insurance. The insurer insures against "detainments of all kings, princes and people." He is not by this understood to insure against any promiscuous or lawless rabble which may be guilty of attacking or detaining a ship. 2 Marsh. Ins. 508. Vide Body politic; Nation.

References in classic literature ?
There's things folks 'ud pay to be rid on, besides varmin."
But they said it was along of his wife's dying; though there's reasons in things as nobody knows on--that's pretty much what I've made out; yet some folks are so wise, they'll find you fifty reasons straight off, and all the while the real reason's winking at 'em in the corner, and they niver see't.
But there's folks 'ud hold a sieve under the pump and expect to carry away the water."
"Then, sir, if I may speak--as, for all I'm a woman, and there's folks as thinks a woman's fool enough to stan' by an' look on while the men sign her soul away, I've a right to speak, for I make one quarter o' the rent, and save another quarter--I say, if Mr.
They must speak their mind about it, annoying all easy-going folk, and spend their time and money in having a tinker at it, however hopeless the job.
And so we got to know all the country folk and their ways and songs and stories by heart, and went over the fields and woods and hills, again and again, till we made friends of them all.
For three hundred years my folk have swinked and sweated, day in and day out, to keep the wine on the lord's table and the harness on the lord's back.
"Better that than stealing the deer that thou art placed to guard, like some folk I know."
Why don't you folks tell me to take in the slack of my jaw and go home?"
He wants a home and folks. I told him how good you were to me, and to Fluffy and Buffy, and that I knew you would be to him, because of course he's even nicer than cats and dogs."
"Before ever we were born our folks were walkin' across the plains together."
Some one of the Folk saw me and uttered a warning cry.