business

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business

n. any activity or enterprise entered into for profit. It does not mean it is a company, a corporation, partnership, or have any such formal organization, but it can range from a street peddler to General Motors. It is sometimes significant to determine if an accident, visit, travel, meal or other activity was part of "business" or for pleasure or no particular purpose.

References in periodicals archive ?
Liebling said they want to prevent a repeat of what happened after the 2017 bill became law, when one of Minnesota's biggest insurers, Medica, transferred $120 million from its nonprofit Minnesota HMO to its for-profit operations elsewhere.
"The incentive of a for-profit is to get everyone they can possibly get to enroll--which means a student for whom online education will not likely be a constructive, positive, successful experience--a for-profit has a strong incentive to enroll them anyway," said Shireman.
In CBSAs with a higher share of for-profit schools, the expansion in for-profit enrollment during downturns was greater.
Grewal, who says the department is no longer cooperating with or responding to New Jersey's requests to address for-profit college fraud, voices the frustration of many who demand to see for-profit schools that have behaved improperly held fully accountable.
"It's time to turn off the spigot of federal student loan that are flowing into these for-profit colleges," Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey told the Times.&nbsp
Geneson found that for-profit carriers are more likely to offer the best prices outside the silver plan level.
What made possible the for-profit higher education business model was the pot of federal financial aid, including Pell Grants, student loans, and G.I.
Students at for-profit schools are more likely to live at or below the federal poverty level and receive food stamp benefits than students in other sectors of higher education.
Taking those four measures and weighting them equally shows that students would be well served to avoid the New England Institute of Art, a private for-profit college, where the typical net price is $29,700, median debt is $30,600, 16 percent of borrowers default on their loans, and just 36 percent of students graduate.
Under the proposed rules, for-profit schools would have to meet federal accreditation and licensing standards or lose eligibility for their students to receive the federal loans and grants on which most rely to pay for their educations.
For-profit schools are no new phenomenon to legal education experts.