alien

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alien

1) n. a person who is not a citizen of the country. 2) in the United States any person born in another country to parents who are not American and who has not become a naturalized citizen. There are resident aliens officially permitted to live in the country and illegal aliens who have sneaked into the country or stayed beyond the time allowed on a visa. 3) v. to convey title to property.

alien

a person who is not a British citizen, a Commonwealth citizen, a BRITISH PROTECTED person or a citizen of the Republic of Ireland.

At common law, a distinction is drawn between friendly aliens and enemy aliens, with the latter comprising not only citizens of hostile states but also all others voluntarily living in enemy territory or carrying on business there; enemy aliens are subject to additional disabilities.

ALIEN, persons. One born out of the jurisdiction of the United States, who has not since been naturalized under their constitution and laws. To this there are some exceptions, as this children of the ministers of the United States in foreign courts. See Citizen, Inhabitant.
     2. Aliens are subject to disabilities, have rights, and are bound to perform duties, which will be briefly considered. 1. Disabilities. An alien cannot in general acquire title to real estate by the descent, or by other mere operation of law; and if he purchase land, he may be divested of the fee, upon an inquest of office found. To this general rule there are statutory exceptions in some of the states; in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Louisiana, New Jersey, Rev. Laws, 604, and Michigan, Rev. St. 266, s. 26, the disability has been removed; in North Carolina, (but see Mart. R. 48; 3 Dev. R. 138; 2 Hayw. 104, 108; 3 Murph. 194; 4 Dev. 247; Vermont and Virginia, by constitutional provision; and in Alabama, 3 Stew R. 60; Connecticut, act of 1824, Stat. tit. Foreigners, 251; Indiana, Rev. Code, a. 3, act of January 25, 1842; Illinois, Kentucky, 1 Litt. 399; 6 Mont. 266 Maine, Rev. St,. tit. 7, c. 93, s. 5 Maryland, act of 1825, ch. 66; 2 Wheat. 259; and Missouri, Rev. Code, 1825, p. 66, by statutory provision it is partly so.
     3. An alien, even after being naturalized, is ineligible to the office of president of the United States; and in some states, as in New York, to that of governor; he cannot be a member of congress, till the expiration of seven years after his naturalization. An alien can exercise no political rights whatever; he cannot therefore vote at any political election, fill any office, or serve as a juror. 6 John. R. 332.
     4.-2. An alien has a right to acquire personal estate, make and enforce contracts in relation to the same - he is protected from injuries, and wrongs, to his person and property, his relative rights and character; he may sue and be sued.
     5.-3. He owes a temporary local allegiance, and his property is liable to taxation. Aliens are either alien friends or alien enemies. It is only alien friends who have the rights above enumerated; alien enemies are incapable, during the existence of war to sue, and may be ordered out of the country. See generally, 2 Kent. Com. 43 to 63; 1 Vin. Ab. 157; 13 Vin. ab. 414; Bac. Ab. h.t.; 1 Saund. 8, n.2; Wheat. Dig. h.t.; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, if a foreign person is ineligible for access to EAR-or ITAR-controlled technology, the company may apply to the appropriate U.S.
entities to foreign persons has gained greater attention in recent years.
business to a foreign person? Does the transaction involve a foreign national or any entity controlled by a foreign national, foreign government or foreign entity?
federal income tax perspective, the primary obstacle facing foreign persons who invest in U.S.
The income eligible for that reduced rate includes a wide range of income--including income from selling goods, providing services, or licensing intangible property--earned directly from unrelated foreign persons. But it also includes income from related-party transactions--including related-party services income and related-party royalties--where the related foreign person either resells the property for foreign use or uses the property in selling other goods for foreign use or providing services to unrelated foreign persons.
The amount that must be withheld in connection with the sale of US real property by a foreign person can be decreased (or eliminated) pursuant to a withholding certificate issued by the IRS.
The new regulations provide that a foreign person wholly owns a domestic disregarded entity if that person has "direct or indirect sole ownership of the entity" (Regs.
U.S.-source income paid to foreign persons, as reported on Form 1042-S, Foreign Person's U.S.-Source Income Subject to Withholding, totaled $672.9 billion for Calendar Year 2012.
stock or securities issued by a foreign person, such as shares issues in a foreign corporation;
Therefore, the mere fact that a foreign person owns USRPI does not trigger any negative tax consequences under IRC section 897.
Under the ITAR, an "export" includes not only physically taking a defense article out of the United States but also disclosing (including oral or visual disclosure) or transferring technical data to a foreign person, whether in the U.S.

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