forensic testimony

forensic testimony

n. any testimony of expert scientific, engineering, economic or other specialized nature used to assist the court and the lawyers in a lawsuit or prosecution. (See: forensic, forensic medicine)

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier, during graphic forensic testimony from a defence pathologist, Pistorius sat in the dock, retching into a bucket.
Earlier on Monday, when he heard the graphic forensic testimony, Pistorios wept and threw up in court.
As Judge Gouge pointed out in The Inquiry into Pediatric Forensic Pathology" in Canada, October 2008, Charles Smith's forensic testimony for the prosecution was responsible for many false accusations of murder and many false guilty convictions and imprisonments.
3) The evidence that sent Wilhoit to death row rested heavily on the forensic testimony of two dental "experts," not long out of dental school, who claimed a bite-mark match between his teeth and marks left on the victim.
The problems with forensic testimony extend beyond Mississippi.
The prosecutor tells David: "None of your evidence is supported by forensic testimony.
Supreme Court rulings have managed to impose greater scientific rigor on forensic testimony.
Even if the psychiatrist has maintained malpractice insurance, he or she should ensure that the policy actually covers forensic testimony, since not all policies do include such coverage.
Errors at the lab are already providing defense lawyers with ammunition to use in some cases and appear to threaten the FBI with challenges to expert forensic testimony in cases based on the more than 600,000 evidence examinations conducted each year by the lab.
The courts entertain a wide variety of expert testimony, including medical testimony, forensic testimony from police officials and crime laboratories, architectural and engineering testimony and testimony on a wide variety of business issues (such as industry practices and proprietary technical matters).

Full browser ?