Form

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Form

A prototype of an instrument to be employed in a legal transaction or a judicial proceeding that includes the primary essential matters, the appropriate technical phrases or terms, and any additional material required to render it officially accurate, arranged in suitable and systematic order, and conducive to Adaptation to the circumstances of the particular case.

The expression form of the statute signifies the language or structure of a statute, and, therefore, the restriction or command that it might include, as used in the phrase in criminal Pleading "against the form of statute in that case made and provided."A matter of form, as distinguished from a matter of substance—with respect to pleadings, affidavits, indictments, and other legal instruments—entails the method, style, or form of relating the applicable facts; the selection or arrangement of terms; and other such matters without influencing the essential sufficiency or validity of the instrument, or without reaching the merits.

References in classic literature ?
Let him remember Lyell's profound remark, that the thickness and extent of sedimentary formations are the result and measure of the degradation which the earth's crust has elsewhere suffered.
Some of these formations, which are represented in England by thin beds, are thousands of feet in thickness on the Continent.
Nor is their rarity surprising, when we remember how large a proportion of the bones of tertiary mammals have been discovered either in caves or in lacustrine deposits; and that not a cave or true lacustrine bed is known belonging to the age of our secondary or palaeozoic formations.
But the imperfection in the geological record mainly results from another and more important cause than any of the foregoing; namely, from the several formations being separated from each other by wide intervals of time.
But we can, I think, see why the geological formations of each region are almost invariably intermittent; that is, have not followed each other in close sequence.
I am convinced that all our ancient formations, which are rich in fossils, have thus been formed during subsidence.
Consequently formations rich in fossils and sufficiently thick and extensive to resist subsequent degradation, may have been formed over wide spaces during periods of subsidence, but only where the supply of sediment was sufficient to keep the sea shallow and to embed and preserve the remains before they had time to decay.
The island-town is known for its picturesque rock formations.
Overall, the reservoir potential of the Kawagarh Formation is characterized as very poor.
In my mind it wasn't the formation, it was the players who lost the game in Israel.

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