foster child

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foster child

n. a child without parental support and protection, placed with a person or family to be cared for, usually by local welfare services or by court order. The foster parent(s) do not have custody, nor is there an adoption, but they are expected to treat the foster child as they would their own in regard to food, housing, clothing and education. Most foster parents are paid by the local government or a state agency.

foster child

see FOSTER PARENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curry's foster sisters were a part of a larger population of teen parents in Texas' foster care system.
4.Sixty percent of youth, ages 13 to 17, in foster care live in congregate or group homes.
To monitor the children in the foster care program, social welfare officers visit the families every month for the first three months, then monthly visits until the process of adoption or reuniting with families are completed, Saycon said.
In today's society, caring for orphans is most often operationalized through foster care and adoption (Nickman et al., 2005).
A lack of foster carers means that Liverpool City Council needs to pay private foster care agencies to ensure it fulfils its obligations to children needing a loving foster family.
"The foster care students deserve an education, and provide the best that we can for them," she said.
Accusations of mismanagement and abuse by a Portland-area foster care provider led Gov.
Half a million children enter the foster care system each year, and almost a third lack a legal advocate to stand for them and ensure the services and support they need to succeed, according to CASA.
Pending regulatory approvals, the company's new contract is expected to commence in November 2015 and expects to serve up to 25,000 foster care members.
Third, with few exceptions (Gardener, 1998; Iglehart & Becerra, 2002; Whiting & Lee, 2003), very little empirical research has qualitatively examined the perspectives of individuals who were once in the foster care system, as well as how race, class, and gender impact these experiences (Harvey, Loughney, & Moore, 2002).
When the researchers looked at the nationwide foster care entries in the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System, they found that the foster care entries of the study's last five years were related to parental drug use.
"The number of foster care entries related to drug use has been increasing for quite a long time," noted lead researcher Angelica Meinhofer.

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