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free

of a person, having personal rights or liberty; not enslaved or confined. Of property, not subject to payment of rent or performance of services (freehold) or not subject to any burden or charge, such as a mortgage or lien (unencumbered ).
References in classic literature ?
Suddenly the thought darted through her mind that THIS ONCE she might send for a dish of mince-pies from Freely's: she knew he had some.
The infection spread; soon there was a party or clique in Grimworth on the side of "buying at Freely's"; and many husbands, kept for some time in the dark on this point, innocently swallowed at two mouthfuls a tart on which they were paying a profit of a hundred per cent., and as innocently encouraged a fatal disingenuousness in the partners of their bosoms by praising the pastry.
Edward Freely's other personal pretensions had been of an entirely insignificant cast.
Freely's qualities in the maturer minds of Grimworth through the early months of his residence there.
Edward Freely, who had become familiar with the most luxuriant and dazzling beauty in the West Indies.
Freely had early been smitten by Penny's charms, as brought under his observation at church, but he had to make his way in society a little before he could come into nearer contact with them; and even after he was well received in Grimworth families, it was a long while before he could converse with Penny otherwise than in an incidental meeting at Mr.
Freely admired her, and she felt sure that it was he who had sent her a beautiful valentine; but her sister seemed to think so lightly of him (all young ladies think lightly of the gentlemen to whom they are not engaged), that Penny never dared mention him, and trembled and blushed whenever they met him, thinking of the valentine, which was very strong in its expressions, and which she felt guilty of knowing by heart.
Freely! her father would very likely object--she felt sure he would, for he always called Mr.
Who can believe that animals closely resembling the Italian greyhound, the bloodhound, the bull-dog, or Blenheim spaniel, &c.--so unlike all wild Canidae--ever existed freely in a state of nature?
Again, all recent experience shows that it is most difficult to get any wild animal to breed freely under domestication; yet on the hypothesis of the multiple origin of our pigeons, it must be assumed that at least seven or eight species were so thoroughly domesticated in ancient times by half-civilized man, as to be quite prolific under confinement.
Then he seemed to breathe more freely, and recovered some of his jaunty impudence.
or by the fear of taking Emily into his confidence too freely?