friction

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It may be that Willoughby reflects the level of full employment (and so this city's entire unemployed being frictionally unemployed) in the sense that there is no discernible downward trend and that this level of full employment is somewhat immune to economic downturns such as the impact of the global financial crisis.
In the same period the number of cyclically unemployed soared to 339,000, the highest level ever recorded; while that of frictionally unemployed dropped to 221,000, a five-year low.
Byatt's novelistic discourse is a heady matrix presenting multiple possibilities without authorizing single meanings; it is a force-field of intertextual and intergeneric discourses encountering each other tangentially or frictionally in dialogic interplay.
Their results suggest that an increase in the number of cyclically and frictionally uninsured generates less welfare loss than an increase in the number of structurally uninsured.
The conviction, which runs, for example, through almost all of Professor Pigou's work, that money makes no real difference except frictionally and that the theory of production and employment can be worked out (like Mill's) as being based on 'real' exchanges with money introduced perfunctorily in a later chapter, is the modern version of the classical tradition.
FM mixer has the ability to frictionally elevate the temperature of material being mixed and to disperse agglomerated fine powders including most pigments.
workers are always destined to be either frictionally or structurally unemployed--by being in the wrong places or having the wrong skills to fill available jobs.
The influence of a variable normal load on the forced vibration of a frictionally damped structure", Transactions of the ASME, Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, Vol.
To the extent that unemployed workers are averse to technological change, it can thus be understood from the fact that it may force them to go through an unpleasant process of finding a new job, being frictionally unemployed meanwhile.