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full

adjective abounding, abundant, affluent, baggy, brimful, brimming over, charged, chock-full, comprehensive, crammed, detailed, entire, entirely occupied, exhaustive, filled, filled to utmost capacity, flush, fraught, glutted, gorged, imbued, integer, laden, loaded, mature, maximum, occupied, overflowing, packed, plenary, plenus, plethoric, replete, repletus, rich, sated, satiated, satisfied, saturated, soaked, stuffed, swollen, teeming, total, unabridged, well-provided, well-stocked, well-supplied, whole
Associated concepts: full amount, full and true value, full cash value, full consideration, full control, full faith and credit, full hearing, full opportunity to be heard, full payyent, full performance, full satisfaction, full settlement, fulllime employment
See also: absolute, broad, complete, comprehensive, copious, gross, inclusive, intact, orotund, outright, plenary, populous, profuse, replete, ripe, thorough, total, unlimited, unmitigated, unqualified
References in periodicals archive ?
That promise can only be redeemed at a particular moment in the future, "the fulness of the time" (MG I, l.
Bred for farther in the fulness of time, Royal Exchange is a confident selection.
To resolve the matter, I decided to list all the words ending in - fulness and compare them with the -lessnesses.
Her mark of 72 could emerge exceedingly frivolous in the fulness of time.
There are two puzzles about Marsilius and Ockham which have perplexed historians of political thought: 1) Why did not Ockham, a fierce critic of Avignon, adopt Marsilius' notion of the papal fulness of power, and 2) Why was Ockham so unreceptive to Marsilius' call for a general council?
In fact, breed scores were calculated for four behavioural traits-play fulness, curiosity/fearlessness, sociability and aggressiveness.
he sustains us within himself in love and hard labor, until the fulness of time.
Wolfe reminds readers before the novel begins that "he meditated no man's portrait here," although his "main concern was to give fulness, life, and intensity to the actions and people in the book" (vii).
But such anxiety is justified in the situation where there is a tension between participation in the fulness of being and the possibility of losing it.
Another caveat: my question has to do with the non-coercive jurisdiction of the state, the common good in the wider sense expressed in Dignitatis Humanae which "consists in the entirety of those conditions of social life under which men enjoy the possibility of achieving their own perfection in a certain fulness of measure and also with some relative ease.
Agency, motivation, and activities are shifted: rather than "Idleness and Fulness of every thing" begetting in George "a desire of enjoying the women" and rather than their "Lusts" giving them "liberty" to engage in sexual intercourse openly (12), in The Grand Magazine "nature put them in mind of the great command of the Almighty to our first parents, as if they had been conducted thither by the hand of Providence, to people a new world.