further

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further

adverb a greater extent, additionally, at a further point, at a more distant point, besides, beyond, else, extra, farther, furthermore, in addition, more, plus, to a greater extent
Associated concepts: continuance, further consideration, furrher conveyance, further hearing, further notice, further prooeeding, further security, further waste, furtherance

further

verb advance, contribute to, facilitate, favor, forward, foster, impel, motivate, move, promote
See also: accrue, additional, advance, aggravate, aid, assist, benefit, compound, countenance, cultivate, develop, exacerbate, expand, expedite, facilitate, favor, foster, hasten, help, increase, inure, nurture, organize, parlay, precipitate, prefer, promote, raise, side, subsidize, support
References in classic literature ?
Carr an opportunity to visit San Francisco on general business of the mine, which could not, however, prevent him from arranging further combinations with capital.
Carr announced his intention of proceeding to Sacramento, on further business of the mine, leaving his two daughters in the family of a wealthy friend until he should return for them.
Yet she was so self-possessed when the party joined her, that the singular rencontre and her explanation of the stranger's sudden departure excited no further comment.
And you, madame, will confer a great favor upon me if you will but let me know if either of those rascals troubles you further.
Tarzan saw nothing further of any of the actors in the little drama that he had caught a fleeting glimpse of until late in the afternoon of the last day of the voyage.
The incidents, however, have all the further fascination of supernatural romance; and the union of this element with the homely sincerity of the style accounts for much of the peculiar quality of the book.
But I so far succeeded in checking the expression of this view that I will throw, just here, no further light on it than may be offered by the mention of my final observation to Mrs.
Ah, remember that, until further evidence, I now accuse nobody.
From these two acts, it appears, 1st, that the object of the convention was to establish, in these States, A FIRM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; 2d, that this government was to be such as would be ADEQUATE TO THE EXIGENCIES OF GOVERNMENT and THE PRESERVATION OF THE UNION; 3d, that these purposes were to be effected by ALTERATIONS AND PROVISIONS IN THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION, as it is expressed in the act of Congress, or by SUCH FURTHER PROVISIONS AS SHOULD APPEAR NECESSARY, as it stands in the recommendatory act from Annapolis; 4th, that the alterations and provisions were to be reported to Congress, and to the States, in order to be agreed to by the former and confirmed by the latter.
Those who maintain the affirmative ought at least to mark the boundary between authorized and usurped innovations; between that degree of change which lies within the compass of ALTERATIONS AND FURTHER PROVISIONS, and that which amounts to a TRANSMUTATION of the government.
I had forged ahead for perhaps a mile or more without hearing further sounds, when the trail suddenly debouched onto a small, open plateau near the summit of the pass.
I had gone but a short distance further when what seemed to be an excellent trail opened up around the face of a high cliff.