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(The English word "jeans" comes from the French "Jannes fustian," meaning fustian, or twilled cotton cloth, from the city of Jannes, old French for Genoa, Italy.)
George's Chapel in the cathedral contains the faded fustian of the Tigers, the Royal Leicestershire Regiment, who earned their emblem and soubriquet, plus the superscription "Hindoostan," by battling against the ancestors of those now colonizing Leicester in their historic turn.
O'Connor, a gentleman who usually dressed like one, wore a suit of fustian for this occasion, thereby proclaiming for all the world his identification with the working classes.
(See, for example, Le Lac du Nord-Est [The Lake of the North-East], 1975.) Some lighter, more dexterous, even calligraphic paintings on paper--but still huge for all that--completed an informative, auspicious but equivocal exhibition that further valorized Riopelle's painting of the '50s (about which there is a settled, positive consensus) while exposing anew the overbearing fustian of his later work.
Words and their connotations have changed as well and the name that Appleton had carefully selected in 1910--the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities--had become a subtle liability: For better or worse, by 2004, the words 'society' and 'antiquities' had exclusionary and fustian connotations, creating barriers for many who might otherwise be attracted by the organisation's collections and work.
She had dreamed of a real home for herself and the babies, and the fiance, a home very different from this good and blessed and fustian and oppressive tabernacle of Boughton probity and kind intent.
She covers materials, such as velvet, fustian and cloth of gold as well as colors, which were also regimented.
To me, Bloom's fustian call to cultural disarmament feels as shortsighted as any radical critic's incapacity to recognize that "Part of the rhetoric of 'pluralism' and 'diversity,' the elevation of 'multi-cultural' experience cloaks the abandonment of traditional humanistic culture" (Kimball 175).
[Glory] had dreamed of a real home for herself and the babies, and the fiance a home very different from this good and blessed and fustian and oppressive tabernacle of Boughton probity and kind intent.
LAWYERS are deterred from applying to be High Court judges because they are seen as "old fashioned" and "fustian", the country's most senior judge said yesterday.
Is supper ready, the house trimmed, rushes strewed, cobwebs swept, the servingmen in their new fustian, the white stockings, and every officer his wedding garment on?
Several centuries ago jean was an adjective describing a kind of fustian (a heavy cotton and linen cloth).