Speak

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TO SPEAK. This term is used in the English law, to signify the permission given by a court to the prosecutor and defendant in some cases of misdemeanor, to agree together, after which the prosecutor comes into court and declares himself to be satisfied; when the court pass a nominal sentence. 1 Chit. Pr. 17.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
Poetry, generally speaking, is the expression of the deeper nature; it belongs peculiarly to the realm of the spirit.
It is also used in the construction of the upper decks of steamboats, but generally speaking, the hurricane's usefulness has outlasted it.
Generally speaking, arched doorways or windows stood much better than any other part of the buildings.
In the former, the revision of the law only will be, generally speaking, the proper province of the Supreme Court; in the latter, the re-examination of the fact is agreeable to usage, and in some cases, of which prize causes are an example, might be essential to the preservation of the public peace.
Manners as well as appearance are, generally speaking, so totally different.
"Well," I began, "as you may guess, generally speaking, elephant hunters are a rough set of men, who do not trouble themselves with much beyond the facts of life and the ways of Kafirs.
So, generally speaking in the classroom a teacher does all the things that a student is supposed to do, such as reading out a lesson, translation of a unit, difficult words and etc.
Generally speaking, use of smart sanctions should be expected, which will be reinforced in time and lead to increase of the transaction expenses and gradual decrease of the economic interdependency of the EU and Russia, Gligorov concludes.
Generally speaking, Cate Blanchett is generally speaking
"We all know that, generally speaking, the person who is the love of your life when you are in the sixth form will seem as attractive as a pint of sour milk a couple of years later" - Broadcaster Janet Street-Porter on the teenage runaways from Stonyhurst College.
But, generally speaking, they only cause real problems if they are allowed to fester and escalate, instead of being dealt with quickly - and above all, as diplomatically - as possible.
Dr Roland Salmon, head of Public Health Wales' clinical disease surveillance centre, said: "Generally speaking, these are very healthy No risk: Hanson communities, but there was an exception to that in one of the areas examined, which included Caergwrle, Hope and Llanfynydd.

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