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Code

A systematic and comprehensive compilation of laws, rules, or regulations that are consolidated and classified according to subject matter.

Many states have published official codes of all laws in force, including the Common Law and statutes as judicially interpreted, that have been compiled by code commissions and enacted by legislatures. The U.S. Code (U.S.C.) is the compilation of federal laws.

code

n. a collection of written laws gathered together, usually covering specific subject matter. Thus, a state may have a civil code, corporations code, education code, evidence code, health and safety codes, insurance code, labor code, motor vehicle code, penal code, revenue and taxation code, and so forth. Federal statutes which deal with legal matters are grouped together in codes. There are also statutes which are not codified. Despite their apparent permanence codes are constantly being amended by legislative bodies. Some codes are administrative and have the force of law even though they were created and adopted by regulatory agencies and are not actually statutes or laws. (See: law, statute)

code

see CODIFICATION.

CODE, legislation. Signifies in general a collection of laws. It is a name given by way of eminence to a collection of such laws made by the legislature. Among the most noted may be mentioned the following:

CODE, JUSTINIAN, civil law. A collection of the constitutions of the emperors, from Adrian to Justinian; the greater part of those from Adrian to Constantine are mere rescripts; those from Constantine to Justinian are edicts or laws, properly speaking.
     2. The code is divided into twelve books, which are subdivided into titles, in which the constitutions are collected under proper heads. They are placed in chronological order, but often disjointed. At the head of each constitution is placed the name of the emperor who is the author, and that of the person to whom it is addressed. The date is at the end. Several of these constitutions, which were formerly in the code were lost, it is supposed by the neglect of "copyists. Some of them have been restored by modern authors, among whom may be mentioned Charondas, Cugas, and Contius, who translated them from Greek, versions.

CODE, OF LOUISIANA. In 1822, Peter Derbigny, Edward Livingston, and Moreau Lislet, were selected by the legislature to revise and amend the civil code, and to add to it such laws still in force as were not included therein. They were authorized to add a system of commercial law, and a code of practice. The code the prepared having been adopted, was promulgated in 1824, under the title of the "Civil Code of the State of Louisiana."
     2. The code is based on the Code Napoleon, with proper and judicious modifications, suitable for the state of Louisiana. It is composed of three books: 1. the first treats of persons; 2. the second of things, and of the different modifications of property; 3. and the third of the different modes of acquiring the property of things. It contains 3522 articles, numbered from the beginning, for the convenience of reference.
     3. This code, it is said, contains many inaccurate definitions. The legislature modified and changed many of the provisions relating to the positive legislation, but adopted the definitions and abstract doctrines of the code without material alterations. From this circumstance, as well as from the inherent difficulty of the subject, the positive provisions of the code are often at variance with the theoretical part, which was intended to elucidate them. 13 L. R. 237.
     4. This code went into operation on the 20th day of May,. 1825. 11 L. R. 60. It is in both the French and English languages; and in construing it, it is a rule that when the expressions used in the French text of the code are more comprehensive than those used in English, or vice versa, the more enlarged sense will be taken, as thus full effect will be given to both clauses. 2 N. S. 582.

CODE, NAPOLEON. The Code Civil of France, enacted into law during the reign of Napoleon, bore his name until the restoration of the Bourbons when it was deprived of that name, and it is now cited Code Civil.

References in periodicals archive ?
The genetic code is translated in groups of 3 letters, each resembling a word, which is translated into a single part of the protein.
But when those same variations in the genetic code are inherited by the child, they restrict the amount of insulin the baby can produce, so limiting its growth and counter-acting some of the mother's growth-promoting effects.
The study looked at the heart disease risk conferred by several single-letter changes in the genetic code, or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), on 9p21.
The reason for the delay in analyzing wheat's genetic code, Hall said, was that the code is massive - far larger than corn or rice and five times the length of the one carried by humans.
While other variants of DNA and its cousin RNA have been made before, the new molecule is the first to have unnatural versions of the compounds that constitute all four letters of the genetic code, Inouye and his colleagues report.
Prof Chinnery and his team will investigate which part of the mi-tochondrial DNA genetic code is responsible for the altered risk of developing Parkinson's.
What I initially thought was a potential means by which government agencies and eugenicists could harvest and misuse people's genetic code, I eventually saw as a powerful tool to delve deeper into the cultural diversity of my African ancestry.
After making his own genetic code available on a genealogy website, he was contacted by two men with genetic similarities to his and a surname in common with each other.
Deciphering the genetic code revealed the language used by DNA to propagate information.
All the trillions of co-ordinated physical-chemical interactions which occur throughout the living human body every second, whether in a zygote or in an adult whose body contains 50 to 100 trillion cells, have their ultimate source of integration, unity, and co-ordination in the genetic code of the original single-cell zygote.
Scientists hope cracking the genetic code will lead to a diagnostic tool and, eventually, to a selective treatment.
As the introductory wall label trumpeted: Life, which is to say the genetic code, "can now be reduced to pixels and processed as data." Spectacular data were thus ubiquitous, but inferences were far from transparent.