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a Jewish religious divorce without which partners are not free to be properly married within the faith. It is organized through the BETH DIN. The Beth Din does not grant a decree; it merely supervises the writing of the get, the deed recording the dissolution. All that is required is to show that the parties consent to divorce. In the UK, however, divorce does not require consent, so a conflict can arise where a party has a civil divorce but not a religious divorce. In England and Wales, by virtue of the Divorce (Religious Marriages) Act 2002, the court has power to refuse decree absolute, where, inter alia, the parties were married according to the ‘usages of the Jews’, to refuse a decree of divorce until a declaration is obtained from both parties that the necessary religious steps have been taken.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
It was voted second worst in terms value for money and third worst for ease of getting around -meaning that it had a presence in worst performing of all but two categories, cleanest streets and best public transport.
BEIRUT: Beirut's cheapest way of getting around became less of a bargain after minivan drivers across the capital hiked fares from LL1,000 to LL1,500 Monday, citing rising gasoline prices and a recent wage increase decision.
Rob Grisdale, chief executive of Scratch-Bikes, added: "Newcastle is a compact city, so cycling is a brilliant way of getting around and an excellent way to get fit and healthy as well as seeing more of the city.
"We're aiming to make the public aware but also the relevant authorities on the rights of pedestrians, one of the main issues being getting around safely on foot," said Ioannidou.
Out in the Haitian countryside we came upon, I guess, a mud puddle, but it was an enormous Haitian one and there was no getting around it.
While it is illegal to sell mephedrone as a drug, suppliers are getting around the law by describing it as "plant food" and marking it "not for human consumption".
If someone who was Spanish, for instance, was visiting the United States, he or she could have great difficulty getting around.
Now thanks to CEMEX Materials, based at Taff's Well Quarry, getting around should be a lot easier.
But wouldn't it be nice if you could also use the navigation system for getting around on foot?