give utterance to

References in classic literature ?
It was evident to Levin that Sviazhsky knew an answer to this gentleman's complaints, which would at once demolish his whole contention, but that in his position he could not give utterance to this answer, and listened, not without pleasure, to the landowner's comic speeches.
I was easily led by the sympathy which he evinced to use the language of my heart, to give utterance to the burning ardour of my soul and to say, with all the fervour that warmed me, how gladly I would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise.
At this discovery she became more alarmed than ever, and was about to give utterance to those cries of 'Thieves
In another moment he was dragged into a labyrinth of dark narrow courts, and was forced along them at a pace which rendered the few cries he dared to give utterance to, unintelligible.
As minute after minute passed by, leaving them in undisturbed security, the insinuating feeling of hope was gradually gaining possession of every bosom, though each one felt reluctant to give utterance to expectations that the next moment might so fearfully destroy.
Maximilian stared for a moment at the corpse, gazed all around the room, then upon the two men; he opened his mouth to speak, but finding it impossible to give utterance to the innumerable ideas that occupied his brain, he went out, thrusting his hands through his hair in such a manner that Villefort and d'Avrigny, for a moment diverted from the engrossing topic, exchanged glances, which seemed to say, -- "He is mad
Coming from pre-independence Namibia, I wanted to do something where I could give utterance to people's voices.
Sondheim's priceless lyrics give utterance to the fear that so many of us have that by choosing a particular path for our life, we have perhaps missed out on joys and pleasures and successes that will never be ours.
A monarch who will lead our government and imprint a personality on the Crown, not simply give utterance to dull speeches, penned by dull political writers, with little or no poetry, passion or enthusiasm.
Facing the crowd gathered to hear his final words he said: "I do confess my guilt, which consists in having, to my shame and dishonour, suffered myself, through the pain of torture and the fear of death, to give utterance to falsehoods, imputing scandalous sins and iniquities to an illustrious Order, which hath nobly served the cause of Christianity.
The Church is preserved in the truth and it is her duty to give utterance to and authoritatively to teach that truth.