Place

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PLACE, pleading, evidence. A particular portion of space; locality.
     2. In local actions, the plaintiff must lay his venue in the county in which the action arose. It is a general rule, that the place of every traversable fact, stated in the pleading, must be distinctly alleged; Com. Dig. Pleader, c. 20; Cro. Eliz. 78, 98; Lawes' Pl. 57; Bac. Ab. Venue, B; Co. Litt. 303 a; and some place must be alleged for every such fact; this is done by designating the city, town, village, parish or district, together with the county in which the fact is alleged to have occurred; and the place thus designated, is called the venue. (q.v.)
     3. In transitory actions, the place laid in the declaration, need not be the place where the cause of action arose, unless when required by statute. In local actions, the plaintiff will be confined in his proof to the county laid in the declaration.
     4. In criminal cases the facts must be laid and proved to have been committed within the jurisdiction of the court, or the defendant must be acquitted. 2 Hawk. c. 25, s. 84; Arch. Cr. Pl. 40, 95. Vide, generally, Gould on Pl. c. 3, 102-104; Arch. Civ. Pl. 366; Hamm. N. P. 462; 1 Saund. 347, n. 1; 2 Saund. 5 n.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking on the occasion minister Premadasa said the country can be take forward only by giving due place to the clever people, but not giving places for friends.
Steve West Llandaff Cardiff WHEN will these Welsh language meddlers realise that giving places such as Sully a new Welsh name is pointless as 99% of the population will ignore it?
When schools are oversubscribed, an 'electronic ballot' will be used to allocate places, rather than the current system of giving places to children who live closest to the school, the council said.
It would end the row over top universities such as Oxford and Cambridge giving places to students based on interviews rather than actual grades.