good times


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See: prosperity
References in classic literature ?
I'm much obliged for all your kindness," said the boy, "and very grateful to you for saving my life and sending me home again after all the good times I've had.
I often feel that way, but I have to wait for my good times, and don't stop working to wish for 'em.
We've had good times together; but I think we'll have lots more splendid years ahead.
The former to take good times, when first to relate to a man an angry business; for the first impression is much; and the other is, to sever, as much as may be, the construction of the injury from the point of contempt; imputing it to misunderstanding, fear, passion, or what you will.
A girl like me has got to take her good times when she can.
An' I'll bet he's not particularly joyful at seein' others have a good time.
And some of them suggest plots to me, saying: "Please have Dorothy go to the Land of Oz again"; or, "Why don't you make Ozma and Dorothy meet, and have a good time together?
In good time,' said the locksmith, kindly, 'in good time--don't be down-hearted.
Then it was a very good time for talking, as we stood together under the shade of the large chestnut tree.
We had Jim out of the chains in no time, and when Aunt Polly and Uncle Silas and Aunt Sally found out how good he helped the doctor nurse Tom, they made a heap of fuss over him, and fixed him up prime, and give him all he wanted to eat, and a good time, and nothing to do.
But the other bird sneered at him for being a poor simpleton, who did all the hard work, while the other two stayed at home and had a good time of it.
They were at home in such good time that Kit had rubbed down the pony and made him as spruce as a race-horse, before Mr Garland came down to breakfast; which punctual and industrious conduct the old lady, and the old gentleman, and Mr Abel, highly extolled.