goods


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to goods: Goods and services

Goods

Items; chattels; things; any Personal Property.

Goods is a term of flexible context and meaning and extends to all tangible items.

goods

n. items held for sale in the regular course of business, as in a retail store.

goods

1 for the purposes of the Sales of Goods Act 1979, ‘goods’ include ‘emblements, industrial growing crops and things attached or forming part of the land that are agreed to be severed before sale or under the contract of sale’. For the purposes of the law of Scotland, ‘goods’ are defined by the Act as all corporeal moveables. Specifically excluded, however, is money- unless it is bought as a curiosity, as in the case of gold Jubilee pieces.
2 in the law of the EUROPEAN UNION the word has a special definition in relation to the operation of the customs union and in particular in the provisions relating to the free movement of goods. It covers industrial and agricultural products regardless of whether they come from member states or are imported from other states, and it is this inclusion of imports that makes a customs union different and more substantial than a free trade area. The important focus is upon products that can be valued in money that can be the subject ofa commercial transaction.

GOODS, property. For some purposes this term includes money, valuable securities, and other mere personal effects. The term. goods and chattels, includes not only personal property in possession, but also choses in action. 12 Co. 1; 1 Atk. 182. The term chattels is more comprehensive than that of goods, and will include all animate as well as inanimate property, and also a chattel real, as a lease for years of house or land. Co. Litt. 118; 1 Russ. Rep. 376. The word goods simply and without qualification, will pass the whole personal estate when used in a will, including even stocks in the funds. But in general it will be limited by the context of the will. Vide 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 289; 1 Chit. Pr. 89, 90; 1. Ves. jr. 63; Hamm. on Parties, 182; 3 Ves. 212; 1 Yeates, 101; 2 Dall. 142; Ayl. Pand. 296; Wesk. Ins. 260; 1 Rop. on Leg. 189; 1 Bro. C. C. 128; Sugd. Vend. 493, 497; and the articles Biens; Chattels; Furniture.
     2. Goods are said to be of different kinds, as adventitious, such as are given or arise otherwise than by succession; dotal goods, or those which accrue from a dowry, or marriage portion; vacant goods, those which are abandoned or left at large.

References in classic literature ?
In the first place, he is the son of a wealthy and wise father, Anthemion, who acquired his wealth, not by accident or gift, like Ismenias the Theban (who has recently made himself as rich as Polycrates), but by his own skill and industry, and who is a well- conditioned, modest man, not insolent, or overbearing, or annoying; moreover, this son of his has received a good education, as the Athenian people certainly appear to think, for they choose him to fill the highest offices.
SOCRATES: Or if we wanted him to be a good cobbler, should we not send him to the cobblers?
"I make my vow!" said the cook, "you are a shrewd hind to dwell thus in a household, and ask thus to dine." So saying he laid aside his spit and drew a good sword that hung at his side.
What say you to resting a space and eating and drinking good health with me.
Yes, but do not persons often err about good and evil: many who are not good seem to be so, and conversely?
Then to them the good will be enemies and the evil will be their friends?
Sir Henry put out all his enormous strength, and Good and I did the same, with such power as nature had given us.
Good went next, and I came last, carrying the basket, and on reaching the bottom lit one of the two remaining matches.
I met her several times out in the country, going a good steady pace, and looking as gay and contented as a horse could be.
He was young, and had a bad name for shying and starting, by which he had lost a good place.
So, in all that year, fivescore or more good stout yeomen gathered about Robin Hood, and chose him to be their leader and chief.
"That will we presently see," quoth Robin, "and meanwhile stand thou where thou art, or else, by the bright brow of Saint AElfrida, I will show thee right good Nottingham play with a clothyard shaft betwixt thy ribs."