gradual

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gradual

(Slow), adjective by degrees, continuous, creeping, gradational, graduated, in steps, leisurely, methodical, orderly, paced, progressive, regular, slow, step-by-step, systematic
See also: deliberate
References in periodicals archive ?
The gradualness process learning the negative in English
She walked the whole journey, and this was some trudge given the gradualness of the slopes and the number of bends.
Tsesis frequently emphasizes the gradualness of the changes, observing that in Germany, for example, anti-Semitic attitudes began as isolated bigotry, but subsequently became entrenched as broader social intolerance, then oppression, and finally genocide (p.
He was completely topsy-turvy; there was no gradualness in him, he suddenly matured and attained manhood; sang his song, and fell silent; and his first sounds did not return to him again--after the fourth canto of Childe Harold we did not hear Byron, but rather some other poet wrote with a high, human talent.
Fabianism has had a lasting influence on the labor movement in Britain and has become synonymous with gradualness.
All of the classic traditions of religious experience understand the mixture of good and evil in human life; all of them know of the need for discipline and order; all of them contain profound ecclesiological truths and practical traditions of communal reform; all of them have also developed wisdom, a "medicine of mercy," a way of being pastoral that addresses the gradualness of human transformation within the Church and society.
Both Maritain and Adler speak of the gradualness and incompleteness of the thinking process.
As Ramsay Macdonald proclaimed there is the inevitability of gradualness.
For, granted that in 1793 Godwin envisioned the ultimate demise of parliamentary government and of the entire legal edifice, yet if he wanted to effect this end gradually (and gradualness is a major component of his thought) what would he allow to carry over from the old institutions, and how could the old, rather than simply disappear, actually become something new?
the classical concept of gradualness will be on one end of the arc which stretches through the gamut of speedier transformations to the other end where the instant conversions magically take place.
23) It is crucial to remember, as Eugen Weber suggests, that modern European languages such as French became "national" only very recently and through a process that was anything but one of pacific gradualness.
The gradualness of the new governmental building blocks was paralleled by the gradualness of the process of bringing in diverse populations.