gradus


Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Wikipedia.
See: degree

GRADUS. This is a Latin word, literally signifying a step; figuratively it is used to designate a person in the ascending or descending line, in genealogy; a degree.

References in periodicals archive ?
McDonald AC, Mac Kenzie WR, Addiss DG, Gradus MS, Linke G, Zembrowski E, et al.
Second, in contrast with Gradus and Smulders (1993), van Ewijk and van Wijnbergen (1995) and Pautrel (2008, 2009) who find a monotonic relationship between growth and the policy level, we obtain an inverted-U relationship implying the existence of a growth-maximizing policy level.
2005), eating disorders (Rowe, Gradus, Pineles, Batten, & Davison, 2009), and homelessness (Hamilton, Poza, & Washington, 2011).
The film, a first from former Miami Herald journalists Ronna Gradus and Jill Bauer, opens on Oct.
The Gradus Lafite Maiden Auction Stakes at Wolverhampton might not take much winning so the fact Alan McCabe has booked Mickael Barzalona for Until It Sleeps could be noteworthy.
grade [French from Latin gradus step, degree, from Latin gradi to step, go; akin to Lithuanian gridyti to go, wander 1796] -ing [Middle English from Old English -ung, -ing, suffix forming nouns from verbs; akin to Old High German -ung suffix forming nouns from verbs]
Bel and Costas, 2006; Callan and Thomas, 2001; Dijk-graaf and Gradus, 2003, 2007).
RENOVATION: Volunteers get to work MUCKING IN: Taking a break in their refurbishment work at the Nuneaton Riding for the Disabled Centre are Walkers Crisps volunteers (from left) Martina Gradus, Liam Plunkett, Jamie Edwards and Kevin McMahon, watched by stable-hand Sharon Wale (back) and one of the horses, Claus
SPI Group's leading brands include Stolichnaya, elit by Stolichnaya, Moskovskaya, Gradus, and Rigas Black Balzam.
One of the most fascinating aspects of compiling a new catalogue of Fux's work was the wide scattering of sources outside Austria: a large number of copies of editions of Gradus ad Parnassum were found in the US and Canada.
Pilgrimage was part of the sacrament of penance--a variety of the bodily suffering that could constitute fulfilment of the obligations of satisfactio operis--while also being equated symbolically with the whole penitential process, made up of a lifelong, iterable, journey-like series of gradus or passus.