case system

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Related to grammatical case: nominative case, Grammatical aspect

case system

n. the method of studying law generally used in American law schools, in which the students read, outline (brief) the cases, discuss and hear lectures about the cases. Each case presented stands for a particular rule of law in the subject matter covered and is contained in "casebooks" on particular topics (contracts, torts, criminal law, constitutional law, agency, etc.). The system is useful since it relates the law to real and factual situations which assists students in memorization and encourages deductive reasoning. The case system is reinforced by textbooks and outlines on the subject matter, which were formerly the principal sources of learning. The method was introduced first at Harvard in 1869 by professor Christopher C. Langdell and soon became standard.

References in periodicals archive ?
The inventory of grammatical cases of the Tsezic languages typically includes the Absolutive, the Ergative, the Instrumental and the first and second Genitive.
This kind of identity between singular and plural does not occur in other lexical types, nor in the grammatical cases of the given word: pert 'house.
It is written in both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets and has seven grammatical cases.
Throughout this range of infinitival relatives, we can identify one common characteristic of the grammatical cases (la, c, e, f).