case system

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Related to grammatical case: nominative case, Grammatical aspect

case system

n. the method of studying law generally used in American law schools, in which the students read, outline (brief) the cases, discuss and hear lectures about the cases. Each case presented stands for a particular rule of law in the subject matter covered and is contained in "casebooks" on particular topics (contracts, torts, criminal law, constitutional law, agency, etc.). The system is useful since it relates the law to real and factual situations which assists students in memorization and encourages deductive reasoning. The case system is reinforced by textbooks and outlines on the subject matter, which were formerly the principal sources of learning. The method was introduced first at Harvard in 1869 by professor Christopher C. Langdell and soon became standard.

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In Algorithm 1 we have six aggregation (sum) functions (one for each grammatical case, e.g., "loct" for the locative, "nomn" for the nominative).
Functions Performed by the Two Infixes: -e- and -o- As noted (3a) describes possession and -e- represents the grammatical case i.e.
The inventory of grammatical cases of the Tsezic languages typically includes the Absolutive, the Ergative, the Instrumental and the first and second Genitive.
(4.) For a detailed discussion of the Old English grammatical case, see McLaughlin (1983), Mitchell (1985), Denison (1993), Allen (1995), and Fischer, van Kemenade, Koopman, and van der Wurff (2000).
(15) Here Theon is, I believe, misinterpreting a Stoic ambiguity kind as embracing a subdivision of what was originally an Aristotelian ambiguity type: the subtype classifies ambiguities caused by absence of formal differentiation, by way of grammatical case, of different grammatical properties or functions--e.g.
The grammatical cases are absolutive (no marking), ergative (-i), first and second genitive (-s, -zo), dative (-z) and instrumental (-d).
In Estonian, for instance, the ubiquitous syncretism and morphological overlapping between grammatical cases is compensated with various syntactic means (Blevins 2005; 2008; Grunthal 2001; 2007).
"The history of the language," writes Lerer, is "a story of a shift from an inflected to an uninflected language." Old English, for instance, had grammatical gender, like Spanish or French, but within a hundred years of the Norman Conquest all inanimate nouns became, simply, "it." Old English had grammatical cases, like Latin or Russian, but these were abandoned.
It is written in both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets and has seven grammatical cases. One day in the office I was asked, in Serbian, if I wanted to order something for lunch.
Throughout this range of infinitival relatives, we can identify one common characteristic of the grammatical cases (la, c, e, f).
We can see, e.g., that some grammatical cases in Estonian and Finnish can identically be written down in Chinese characters while corresponding to common morphemes.
Recent novel views were expressed by Tapani Salminen who has written: "The current view is that there were three grammatical cases in the Proto-Uralic nominal declension.