grand

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grand

adjective august, capacious, compendious, comprehensive, dignified, distinguished, elegant, elevated, eminent, exalted, excellent, famous, first-rate, glorious, good, grandiose, great, illustrious, imperial, important, leading, lofty, magnificent, majestic, mighty, noble, palatial, paramount, pompous, preeminent, princely, prodigious, prominent, proud, renowned, splendid, stately, stellar, sublime, superb, superior, supreme, very magisterial, wide-reaching
See also: elegant, enormous, illustrious, important, momentous, orgulous, paramount, prodigious, proud, stellar

GRAND. An epithet frequently used to denote that the thing. to which it is joined is of more importance and dignity, than other things of the same name; as, grand assize, a writ in a real action to determine the right of property in land; grand cape, a writ used in England, on a plea of land, when the tenant makes default in appearance at the day given for the king to take the land into his hands; grand days, among the English lawyers, are those days in term which are solemnly kept in the inns of court and chancery, namely, Candlemas day, in Hilary term; Ascension day, in Easter term; and All Saint's day, in Michaelmas term; which days are dies non juridici. Grand distress is the name of a writ so called because of its extent, namely, to all. the goods and chattels of the party distrained within the county; this writ is believed to be peculiar to England. Grand Jury. (q. v.) Grand serjeantry, the name of an ancient English military tenure.

References in classic literature ?
De Guiche left De Wardes and Malicorne at the bottom of the grand staircase, while he himself, who shared the favor and good graces of Monsieur with the Chevalier de Lorraine, who always smiled at him most affectionately, though he could not endure him, went straight to the prince's apartments, whom he found engaged in admiring himself in the glass, and rouging his face.
For the last four years he had lived in squalid conditions with a woman whom only Lawson had once seen, in a tiny apartment on the sixth floor of one of the most dilapidated houses on the Quai des Grands Augustins: Lawson described with gusto the filth, the untidiness, the litter.
Yesterday a black satin reticule was lost in the Grands Magasins de la Louvre.