guild


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: alliance, association, compact, company, confederacy, cooperative, enterprise, institute, league, partnership, society, sodality, syndicate, union

GUILD. A fraternity or company. Guild hall, the place of meeting of guilds. Beame's, Glanville, 108 (n).

References in classic literature ?
It was the Sheriff's custom to dine various guilds of the trade, from time to time, on Fair days, for he got a pretty profit out of the fees they paid him for the right to trade in the market-place.
She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her steps till they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people were assembled.
Whereupon, having sold all his meat, he closed his stall and went with them to the great Guild Hall.
At this the Sheriff looked grave and all the guild of butchers too, so that none laughed but Robin, only some winked slyly at each other.
It is my habit to establish a branch of the Emancipation Guild wherever I go.
Each trade, however, had its own guild by which the members of it were bound together.
Year after year the same guild acted the same play.
Not so extraordinary, I replied, if you bear in mind that in former days, as is commonly said, before the time of Herodicus, the guild of Asclepius did not practise our present system of medicine, which may be said to educate diseases.
Let us buy our entrance to this guild by a long probation.
As when a Scout Through dark and desart wayes with peril gone All night; at last by break of chearful dawne Obtains the brow of some high-climbing Hill, Which to his eye discovers unaware The goodly prospect of some forein land First-seen, or some renownd Metropolis With glistering Spires and Pinnacles adornd, Which now the Rising Sun guilds with his beams.
Further, he ought to entertain the people with festivals and spectacles at convenient seasons of the year; and as every city is divided into guilds or into societies,[*] he ought to hold such bodies in esteem, and associate with them sometimes, and show himself an example of courtesy and liberality; nevertheless, always maintaining the majesty of his rank, for this he must never consent to abate in anything.
The world is full of masonic ties, of guilds, of secret and public legions of honor; that of scholars, for example; and that of gentlemen, fraternizing with the upper class of every country and every culture.