habitual criminal


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habitual criminal

n. under the statutes of many states, a person who has been convicted of either two or three felonies (or of numerous misdemeanors), a fact which may increase punishment for any further criminal convictions.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"This means that Pragya Thakur is a habitual criminal looking at her behaviour.
"Second, the sanction imposed by the habitual criminal statute has become considerably more severe a habitual criminal who in 1887 would have faced twenty-five years of imprisonment could today face the far harsher punishment of imprisonment for life.
Also, a police chase of a serious and habitual criminal might be made safer and shorter if assisted by a network of monitoring devices and barrage of artificial intelligence.
I am sure there are many undocumented instances of this travesty of justice, but when you are a magistrate, and someone who looks like a habitual criminal is brought to your court and readily admits everything in the charge sheet, your options are very limited.Something should be done to make the punishment fit the crime.
"Bellerby is a habitual criminal with an atrocious record, and having him behind bars will go a long way in helping us continue to reduce burglaries in the Newcastle and Gateshead areas."
"Bellerby is a habitual criminal with an atrocious record and having him behind bars will go a long way in helping us continue to reduce burglaries in the Newcastle and Gateshead areas.
While Lynn tries to make sense of several perplexing scenarios, a habitual criminal puts the final touches on an evil plan that will change everything.
"If a licensing authority is satisfied, after giving the holder of a driving licence an opportunity of being heard, that he is a habitual criminal or habitual drunkard, it can disqualify the person from holding a driving licence," the law reads.
Cortez Palmer, 38, of 68 Merrick St., was indicted March 20 on two counts of armed robbery, six counts of unarmed robbery and a single count of assault and battery, all as a habitual criminal. The charges stem from robberies that occurred from September through November in Worcester, Oxford, Auburn, Shrewsbury and Millbury.
In his defence the habitual criminal blamed money worries for his crimes.
Although he is not an habitual criminal or migrant worker, he suffered many forms of discrimination.
So, once you get over the fact that Williamson is not Barker and his Fletch is never going to be Barker's Fletch, you can really start to revel in two hugely enjoyable hours in the company of our favourite habitual criminal and his fellow inmates.