Half

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HALF. One equal part of a thing divided into two parts, either in fact or in contemplation. A moiety. This word is used in composition; as, half cent, half dime, &c.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
(21) Clarke plays the part of a 'half-caste' Indigenous man, but it doesn't matter to Chauvel or to audiences that he is a white man in masquerade, as the half-caste is well on his way to 'whiteness' and the Indigenous is already being 'written out'.
Not only that, one teacher surveyed even admitted to believing that slurs like "p***", "coloured", "c***" and "half-caste" were acceptable to use.
On deck amongst that vermin down there?" (LJ 61); and the captain of the Patna calls the half-caste clerk in Singapore, "a God forsaken Portuguee" (LJ 78).
The values of civilisation and domesticity embodied by this European maiden triumph at the end of most texts, although much of the narrative recounts the male protagonist's journey away from her into a world where he is sexually and emotionally excited by the racial other; in these texts set in the Waikato, the woman is invariably a voluptuous 'half-caste' whose mixed blood makes her both enticingly exotic and somehow 'superior' to other Maori.
First missionary then government agent, Hagenauer is notorious in VictorianAboriginal history for his part in the drafting of the Half-Caste Act of 1886, which drove "half-caste" Aborigines from the mission stations into the racialist world of colonial society.
And did anyone really seriously think that certain people would ever allow the presumed future king of England to have an illegitimate, Moslem, half-caste, half-brother?
The book simply focuses on sad little Mary, an Aboriginal girl who lives on a red and dusty cattle station and suffers ostracism because she is half-caste (sic).
From 1874 through to 1921 inter-racial mixing was captured by the use of the "half-caste" category.
Kidman and Jackman sparkle together and the narrative threads are pulled together by Brandon Walters as half-caste boy Nullah.
Based on a true-story book by Doris Pilkington Garimara and also made by an Australian director, Phillip Noyce (Clear and Present Danger), Rabbit-Proof Fence brilliantly illustrated how half-caste children were snatched to work in white society.
With the help of rough diamond and romantic interest Drover (Hugh Jackman) and Nullah (Brandon Walters, who serves as narrator), the half-caste aboriginal boy who stirs her maternal instincts, she intends to drive her 1500 head of cattle across the Northern Territory to sell them as army beef in Darwin, secretly watched over by Nullah's mystic grandfather (David Gulpilil).