hankering


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See: desire, will
References in periodicals archive ?
OSCAR AND YOU: If you have a hankering to hold an Academy Award and haven't yet been to Hollywood & Highland to check out the Oscars display, you have only until March 3 to enjoy this rare opportunity.
As these expense-anathematic luxuries drift off into the mists of history, the prevalent response by chief underwriters is, typically, an impotent combination of hunkering down and hankering for the good old days--neither of which does any good.
The starlet is hankering after rebellious royal, Prince Harry.
And if you've never quite gotten over your hankering for the archetypal '70s guy, may we suggest an evening curled up with Sam Elliott and Parker Stevenson, circa 1976, filling their Speedos in the dopey but delicious Lifeguard (Paramount, $14.
I heartily recommend it to both academic and general readers who have any interests in criminal justice, American history, family history, or a hankering for a well-told historical tale.
She said: "In reality these people are hankering after their youth.
Here's one of his: I had a hankering after a a pint so I went into a pub and said "I'll have a pint and a hankering please.
You'll get a listing of purveyors and producers near you, plus online sources and even restaurants that serve what you have a hankering for.
The artist is not hankering for an earlier time; instead, he is very much the antiquarian, a contemporary figure who, through his obsession with moribund practices, reveals himself as the quintessential man of his time.
It is through her--despite her obvious feelings of being overwhelmed at times--that the children were able to develop their strong sense of individuality, Their mother often found solace in her books: "Our mother's hankering for a life of the mind was honorable and heartfelt.
Now cardiac specialists in Wales are hankering after a heart czar to match the one in England, because he's doing such a good job on focusing attention on issues there.
The reader can take solace, though, in the knowledge that there are already other sources which are certain to satisfy one's intellectual hankering in this regard, including Allen's own, The Arabic Novel: An Historical and Critical Introduction (2nd edition, Syracuse University Press, 1995).