harass

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harass

(either harris or huh-rass) v. systematic and/or continual unwanted and annoying pestering, which often includes threats and demands. This can include lewd or offensive remarks, sexual advances, threatening telephone calls from collection agencies, hassling by police officers, or bringing criminal charges without cause. (See: harassment, sexual harassment)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Theoretically, inscribing horseplay within a theory of gender normalization serves to hide those contradictions, cloaking Oncale's harassers in the guise of normality: not only are they taken as the enforcers of social norms, but they are, by definition, normal themselves.
We have ways to help the victims of the harassers."
After all, it is just another unwanted (non-contact) sexual experience and once can never be sure just how far the harasser will go.
The steady growth of women in higher-level jobs, coupled with the fact that in many sexual harassment cases the alleged harasser is a supervisor and the alleged victim a subordinate, lends itself to the possibility that more women are now in a position to sexually harass male subordinates or at least become the target of sexual harassment claims.
In her second chapter, Beiner suggests that the same refocus would put a good end to the "reasonable woman" debate currently used as part of the standard for determining if a harasser's activities constitute actionable sexual harassment.
Further analysis revealed that female participants rated ambiguous scenarios with both female victims and female harassers as more severely harassing than did male participants.
The question of liability only arises once it has been determined that unlawful harassment has occurred and only when the harasser is in a supervisory position over (directly or indirectly) the employee being harassed.
"They either think it happens to everyone else, so it's not a big deal, or they're afraid if they say something, the harasser will get really mad and hurt them or tease them more."
An outside investigator interviewed the alleged victim, harasser and other witnesses.
My adversary is a shadowy harasser who pesters people with his unsigned mail, spewing bile and contempt and making them wonder if they have a cause of legal action as victims of a hate crime.
Be aware that if both genders were treated the same way by the harasser (unlikely, but possible), this could, per Oncale v.
This means that only individuals who need to know about the complaint, such as the alleged harassers and any witnesses, will be told about it.