harass

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harass

(either harris or huh-rass) v. systematic and/or continual unwanted and annoying pestering, which often includes threats and demands. This can include lewd or offensive remarks, sexual advances, threatening telephone calls from collection agencies, hassling by police officers, or bringing criminal charges without cause. (See: harassment, sexual harassment)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Women who are working at different work places like lady doctors at Government and private hospitals, Female doctors, encountered an unacceptable amount of sexual and gender based Harassment in medical training from fellow students, patients, faculty and doctors they worked with (White 2000).
'Sexual Harassment' occurred in the university environment and hospital environment as well (Lersson, Hensing & Allebeck 2003).
Research findings of Bronner, Peretz & Ehrenfeld (2003) explore the sexual Harassment of Nurses and nursing students that 90% of respondents experienced at least one type of sexual Harassment.
For female Lawyers and women police harassment is more likely to take place because women are moving into previously predominant male dominating jobs.
Harassment from the customers may be more frequent but less extreme given that customer-worker interaction are often more contained and routine than exchange between co-workers or employees and employer (Hughes & Tadic 1998), they further suggested that female employees were also far more accepting of this type of behaviors from customer than from co-workers.
Many laws prohibiting 'Sexual Harassment' recognize that both men and women may be harassers or victims of 'Sexual Harassment.' It is important to note, however, that most victims of 'Sexual Harassment' are women.
'Sexual Harassment' does influence the individual on personal and job related issues.
Of all the forms that violence against women can assume, sexual Harassment is the most ubiquitous and insidious.
'Sexual Harassment' research has been the attempt to differentiate traits consensual forms of workplace sexuality from 'Sexual Harassment' (Dellinger and Williams 2002).
In many situations, sexual Harassment occurs when there are unwanted and unwelcome advancements from a male colleague.
There is another difficulty in defining Harassment because it is not the act, but the way it is experienced, that makes it as Harassment.
Harassment may be established by a single serious incident or a pattern of less severe, but repeated behaviors.