hard money


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: cash
References in periodicals archive ?
Hard money sounds difficult to get, but it doesn't have to be.
The Jeffersonian opponents of the central banking system, on the other hand, preferred "a hard money system based squarely on gold and silver, with banks shorn of all special privileges and hopefully confined to 100 percent specie banking.
The rate of return seemed excessive to the researchers, who admit it's unlikely the hard money contributions they studied represent the total cost to firms of political involvement.
At one of Jim Blanchard's giant hard money investor conferences in New Orleans, Lee told a group of publishers who were asking him if he was doing seminars or on the road speaking at investment conferences, "No, I like to sit in my office, write letters, and have people send me checks.
Despite the marked increase in hard money contributions and the BCRA ban on party soft money, soft money still found its way back into the political system mainly through "527" organizations, political committees organized under Section 527 of the Internal Revenue Code but not always regulated under federal election rules to limit the source and size of campaign contributions.
Under pressure for months to curb the soft money (contributions not regulated by federal election laws) spending of Section 527 political groups, the Federal Election Commission recently adopted a new rule requiring some groups to use federally regulated hard money to pay for at least 50 percent of their expenses, including salaries, rent, and other overhead.
With soft money zeroed out and hard-money limits raised, it wasn't too hard to foresee what McCain-Feingold would yield: Republicans raking in the hard money, and Democrats scrambling.
November will surely see an infusion of hard money and VAC money into both parties.
Democrats and Republicans - Both parties raised roughly equal amounts of soft money in 2000, but Republicans have always bested Democrats in raising hard money contributions.
Individual and political action committee giving to candidates, known as hard money, is capped under federal election laws.
The proposed Ney-Wynn bill caps soft money contributions to national party committees at $75,000 and does not change the current unlimited fundraising for state parties or $1,000 hard money limit.