Block

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Block

A segment of a town or city surrounded by streets and avenues on at least three sides and usually occupied by buildings, though it may be composed solely of vacant lots. The section of a city enclosed by streets that is described by a map which indicates how a portion of land will be subdivided.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstration of complete heart block on 12 lead surface electrocardiogram.
Anti-Ro/SS-A antibodies in the pathophysiology of congenital heart block in neonatal lupus syndrome, an experimental model.
Duncan, "Complete Heart Block Complicating Hyperthyroidism," Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.
Mechanisms of Autoimmune-associated Congenital Heart Block
Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report.
Diagnosis of NLE is made when a newborn of a mother with antibodies to SSA/Ro, SSB/La, or U1 RNP develops complete heart block (and or other cardiac manifestations), typical rash, and hepatic, neurologic, or hematologic manifestations.
A 3rd degree heart block can be congenital or acquired.
It discusses pharmacology (diuretics, vasodilators and neurohormone modulators, positive inotropic drugs, antilipid agents, and antithrombotic and antiplatelet agents); diagnosis, including history and examination, imaging, electrocardiograms, exercise testing, nuclear medicine, hemodynamics and coronary physiology, biopsy, and angiography; and electrophysiology, with discussion of arrhythmia mechanisms, drugs, syncope, atrial fibrillation, tachycardia, bradycardia and heart block, cardiac resynchronization therapy, ambulatory monitoring, cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.
Stitch rows together to make Heart Block. Make 25 total (5 of each red/cream floral).
The differential diagnosis of fetal bradycardia includes sinus bradycardia, nonconducted atrial bigeminy, and congenital heart block. Sinus bradycardia is often a result of conditions that cause fetal hypoxia, such as maternal hypotension, umbilical cord prolapse, and placental abruption.
And some fetuses are at risk of stillbirth when their heartbeat falters, a condition called congenital heart block.
In future, it could help infants born with heart block - a condition in which heartbeats are disrupted.