heteronomous


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heteronomous

subject to an external law, rule, or authority.
References in periodicals archive ?
Westphal claims that transcendental experience in the divine command is traumatic in the heteronomous sense.
Conversely to the prescriptive, heteronomous models, job crafting conceptualizes how people actively adapt the tasks, significance and relationships on their jobs, thus attaching meanings to their work and building a work identity.
The heteronomous ego becomes the locus of a heteronomous sublimation in a broader social-cultural context.
The mediation provided by heteronomous rule-guided ethics shields the moral agent from the pangs of conscience that inevitably arise out of interpersonal responsibility.
Socialist enterprise can not effect another way of life if it does not grant labor something radically different both from structural subordination to capital and from its heteronomous sense, subordinated to a system of command and hierarchy, as occurred during the validity of the Soviet system and in the countries of the so-called "socialist bloc" or "real socialism", euphemism for hiding the affronts which impeded the autonomy of labor outside the gears of capital and its system of command.
Piaget (1932) described early moral development as being heteronomous, by which he meant that from about three to seven years of age, children tend to confuse the outcome, the physical characteristics of the act and its conformity to authority's dicta with moral rightness or wrongness of the act, thus often ignoring the intention behind the act when evaluating whether a behavior is good or bad.
emiratus, especially after the first generation when heteronomous hyperparasitism becomes possible (Walter 1983; Williams 1996).
The literary or artistic field is at all times the site of struggle between the two principles of hierarchization: the heteronomous principle (e.g.
(13) She recognizes that the location or "site" of the project affects the outcome, and identifies four common sites: the "heteronomous" sites that the aspiring professionals do not control (such as civil society and the state) and the "autonomous" sites where the aspiring professionals have partial or full control (such as professional organizations and educational programs).
For Bourdieu (1993) journalism is "the seemingly most heteronomous form of cultural production" which could is not merely dependent on economic incentives but also the outcome of social capital (p.
Fuchs' (2010) evaluation of 'alternative media' is based on its potential to emerge as 'critical media' as it provided 'alternatives to dominant repressive heteronomous perspectives' with the aim of giving voice to the powerless (p.
When a Catholic university abridges the right to unionize of its adjunct faculty it violates its own tradition's teaching, not a heteronomous legal injunction imposed upon it by the government.