heteronomous


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heteronomous

subject to an external law, rule, or authority.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, younger heteronomous thinkers might view maternal reactions as always fair because they are more likely to conform their own behavior to adult expectations.
The notaries clearly failed in their usurpatory tactics with the Law Society and appeared to have failed with legal tactics through the state, so they moved deeper into the advantageous heteronomous end of the continuum and engaged the public through the media.
Buber's analysis of ritual displayed the stance of a philosopher looking behind external behavior in adherence to heteronomous law to uncover a more primary motivation in the sphere of the personal.
The respective self-eliminations of causality and foundational justification provide a negative "deduction" of self-determination by exhibiting how heteronomous determination, where what determines is different from what is determined, collapses on its own terms, leaving the identification of agent and patient before which Socrates stood perplexed.
Bloggs, on the other hand, is in one way apparently more autonomous in his beliefs, though still heteronomous in another.
True science as we understand it was born when the early Ionian philosophers established the principle that science must be autonomous in the sense that in the search for truth the conscience of the scholar is to be the ultimate authority, independent of the heteronomous authority of the worldly or ecclesiastical rulers.
As Bauman (16) states, this is a heteronomous perspective of ethics, because morality lies, essentiality, in the fulfillment of bioethical codes, and the moral reflection (which includes social justice) is not a core issue in the research process and concerns of the researcher.
The author has organized his two introductory chapters and the six contributions that make up the remainder of the main body of the text in two parts devoted to aesthetics, aesthetic autonomy, heteronomous aesthetics, and the various theatre contexts and the aesthetics that inform them.
in which subjects are to internalise rational moral and ethical precepts, without a heteronomous fear driving them" (183).
Kant prevents heteronomous reliance of morality on the philosophy of history.
Bourdieu has argued that journalistic fields are weakly institutionalized: that, like other fields comprised primarily of symbolic production such as art and literature (although not quite to the same extent), the field of journalism is relatively autonomous from political and economic demands, unlike the fields of politics and economics, which are heteronomous within fields of cultural production (Bourdieu, 1993).