hire


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hire

verb add to the payroll, appoint, assign to a position, authorize, commission, conducere, contract for, delegate, designate to a post, employ, engage, enlist, fill a posiiion, fill a vacancy, furnish occupation for, give a job to, give employment to, give work to, induct, install, place in office, procure, put on payroll, put to work, recruit, retain, secure the services of, set to work, staff, take into service, take on
Associated concepts: bailee for hire, carriage, contract for hiring, discrimination in hiring, employment contract
See also: delegate, employ, fare, lease, let, pay, procure, rate, retain, revenue, sublease, wage

hire

the letting out of goods for a money consideration. Many such transactions are controlled by the Consumer Credit Act 1974. It can also be used of the hire of work. See also EMPLOYMENT.

HIRE, contracts. A bailment, where a compensation is to be given for the use of a thing, or for labor or services about it. 2 Kent's Com. 456; 1 Bell's Com. 451; Story on Bailm. Sec. 369; see 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 980, et seq; Pothier, Contrat de Louage, ch. 1, n. 1; Domat, B. 1, tit. 4 Sec. 1, n. 1 Code Civ. art.. 1709, 1710; Civ. Code of Lo., art. 2644, 2645. See this Dict. Hirer; Letter.
     2. The contract of letting and hiring is usually divided into two kinds; first, Locatio, or Locatio conductio rei, the bailment of a thing to be used by the hirer, for a compensation to be paid by him.
     3. Secondly, Locatio operis, or the hire of the labor and services of the hirer, for a compensation to be paid by the letter.
     4. And this last kind is again subdivided into two classes: 1. Locatio operis faciendi, or the hire of labor and work to be done, or care and attention to be bestowed on the goods let by the hirer, for a compensation; or,
     5.-2. Locatio operis mercium vehendarum, or the hire and carriage of goods from one place to another, for a compensation. Jones' Bailm. 85, 86, 90, 103, 118; 2 Kent's Com. 456; Code Civ. art. 1709, 1710, 1711.
     6. This contract arises from the principles of natural law; it is voluntary, and founded in consent; it involves mutual and reciprocal obligations; and it is for mutual benefit. In some respects it bears a strong resemblance to the contract of sale, the principal difference between them being, that in cases of sale, the owner, parts with the whole proprietary interest in the thing; and in cases of hire, the owner parts with it only for a temporary use and purpose. In a sale, the thing itself is the object of the contract; in hiring, the use of the thing is its object. Vinnius, lib. 3, tit. 25, in pr.; Pothier, Louage, n. 2, 3, 4; Jones Bailm. 86; Story on Bailm. Sec. 371.
     7. Three things are of the essence of the contract: 1. That there should be a thing to be let. 2. A price for the hire. 3. A contract possessing a legal obligation. Pothier, Louage, n. 6; Civ. Code of Lo. art. 2640.
     8. There is a species of contract in which, though no price in money be paid, and which, strictly speaking, is not the contract of hiring, yet partakes of its nature. According to Pothier, it is an agreement which must be classed with contracts do ut des. (q.v.) It frequently takes place among poor people in the country. He gives the following example: two poor neighbors, each owning a horse, and desirous to plough their respective fields, to do which two horses are required, one agrees that he will let the other have his horse for a particular time, on condition that the latter will let the former have his horse for the same length of time. Du Louage n. 458. This contract is not a hiring, strictly speaking, for want of a price; nor is it a loan for use, because there is to be a recompense. It has been supposed to be a partnership; but it is different from that contract, because there is no community of profits. This contract is, in general, ruled by, the same principles which govern the contract of hiring. 19 Toull. n. 247.
     9. Hire also, means the price given for the use of the thing hired; as, the hirer is bound to pay the hire or recompense. Vide Domat. liv. 1, tit. 4; Poth. Contrat de Louage; Toull. tomes 18, 19, 20; Merl. Repert. mot Louage; Dalloz, Dict. mot Louage; Argou, Inst. liv. 3, c. 27.

References in periodicals archive ?
As soon as she hires an out-of-state teacher, one of her Ambassadors (community business partners) contacts the person and tells tell them what it's like to live in Vegas.
Although the survey's response rate was not adequate for a detailed statistical analysis, the results indicate that new hires are not living up to firms' expectations, and suggest that universities need to reevaluate their curricula, to address technical skills, as well as critical thinking and interpersonal skills.
She only had two interviews; today a key hire might have 10.
and insure employment eligibility by requiring employers to verify work authorization of all new hires.
Hire Velocity is reinventing the traditional staffing model," added Mark Whittington, Chairman and CEO of parent firm Hire Partners.
These kinds of perks are just a few of the carrots companies are dangling in front of prospective hires to lure them away from their current employers.
One critical issue is whether employers will invest the time and effort necessary to find, attract, recruit, qualify and train new employees whom the employer did not hire before.
As Ebony celebrates its golden anniversary, and both Essence and BLACK ENTERPRISE pay homage to their silver years, black publishers are still the employers in town who hire most black journalists.
The key to gaining control of quality of hire is to make it easy and attractive for the hiring manager to be an active participant in the recruiting process, and to collaborate with recruiters.
And the LAPD and sheriff intend to hire more than 1,600 officers as quickly as possible to beef up patrols and staff jails that will be reopened.
The Los Angeles Police Department wants to hire 720 officers.
Kronos gives JHM Hotels the tools to intelligently match job applicants with the positions best suited to them, allowing JHM to hire smarter, thereby building a better workforce and gaining a significant, long-term competitive advantage," said Chris Marsh, president of the Kronos Talent Management Division.