hoist


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hoist

noun burglary, felonious taking, fraudulent taking, larceny, misappropriation, pilferage, pilfering, robbery, stealing, swindling, theft, thievery, wrongful taking
See also: elevate
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References in periodicals archive ?
The addition of Harrington below-the-hook products complement Hoists Direct's position as a leading distributor of Caldwell, Beta Max, Tractel and Columbus McKinnon below-the-hook lifting devices.
From listening to our customers, we learned what key features they wanted in an electric chain hoist.
Hoist service experts provide a scheduled quarterly analysis of collected data against established key performance indicators (KPIs).
But that life expectancy was brought up short when the motor hoist for rollgate No.
JDN hoists have played their part in this market, offering hoists with lift capacities from 550lbs up to 100 metric tons, with specialized units of 200 metric tons lift capacity having been supplied for BOP handling.
Hoist Finance is a debt restructuring partner to global banks and financial institutions to whom it offers a broad spectrum of advanced solutions for managing overdue consumer receivables.
Dragging the rocket pod is a drag for the hoist cable.
He said he found him hanging in the hoist in his bedroom last January 21.
Lilian Edkins was only meant to stay in City Hospital overnight, according to her family, but they were told to keep her in because she needed a hoist.
The changes in this version reflect the experience gained by the industry using the original guidance; and it incorporates lessons learnt during investigations into lever hoist incidents over the last five years," explains IMCA's Technical Director, Jane Bugler.
On any given hoist operation, four to six people are required: a qualified hoist operator, at least two traffic-control personnel (who can be omitted when roping off the area), one line handler (two if it's a big item), one safety checker, and someone to assist the hoist operator.
After decades of relying on the human eye to spot defects in hoist ropes, the mining industry is about to transition to an automated, computer-based vision system.