Homo


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HOMO. This Latin word, in its most enlarged sense, includes both man and woman. 2 Inst. 45. Vide Man.

References in periodicals archive ?
The first hominins that lived 2.5 million years ago started out in Africa and slowly developed features that caused them to evolve into our genus (groups of related species) - Homo.
Mijares said their discovery adds a new member to the genus Homo and could question earlier concepts that human evolution is a linear process.
The fossils are the earliest known human remains in the Philippines, even preceding the first Homo sapiens dated to 30,000 to 40,000 years ago discovered on Palawan Island, according to Mijares.
In 2003, fossils of another island-dwelling species - Homo floresiensis, dubbed the "Hobbit" due to its diminutive size - were unearthed in a cave on the Indonesian island of Flores, some 1,800 miles (3,000 km) from the Luzon site.
Filipino archeologist Armand Salvador Mijares shows a femur bone, one of those they recovered from Callao Cave belonging to a new specie they called Homo luzonensis, during a press conference in metropolitan Manila, Philippines.
In 2003,fossilsof another island-dwelling species -- Homo floresiensis, dubbed the "Hobbit" due to its diminutive size -- were unearthed in a cave on the Indonesian island of Flores, some 1,800 miles (3,000 km) from the Luzon site.
Unlike other hominids, the tools created by Homo erectus were comparatively low quality and were built using low-quality materials found nearby, experts say.
Ever since Homo naledi remains were unearthed in Africa, scientists have been working to understand how the ancient human species fit in the evolutionary line-up leading up to Homo sapiens.
Previously, it was theorised that Homo sapiens did not live continuously outside Africa until 60,000 years ago.
To investigate the causal effect of homo economicus belief on trust, Xin and Liu (2013) first activated participants' homo economicus belief, either by exposing them to a written introduction about homo economicus or by exposure to economic situations, such as, profit calculation and serving as an enterprise manager, and then measured participants' trust level.
But a bone study by the Australian National University found Homo floresiensis were related to Homo habilis, a more distant ancestor of man who lived in Africa 1.75 million years ago.